Fyodor Dostoevsky

Fyodor Dostoevsky was born in 1821 in Moscow and introduced to myths and stories at a young age. His first novella, Poor Folk (1846) earned him brief success in St Petersburg’s literary circles, but his subsequent involvement in a group that discussed books banned in Tsarist Russia led to him being sent to Siberian prison camp in 1848, followed by a compulsory military service in exile. His 1862 novel The House of the Dead is based on his experience in captivity. In the 1860s, Dostoevsky spent time in Europe, writing Crime and Punishment, The Idiot and Demons. His final novel The Brothers Karamazov (1880) is often considered to be his ultimate masterpiece. He died of a haemorrhage in 1881, aged 59.

Famous for his polyphonously narratives, expressing a multitude of voices and points of view, Dostoevsky explored philosophical, religious and socio-political questions in his work throughout his career. In addition to his novels, he published multiple short stories, two essay collections and a large volume of journalism, as well as translating Honoré de Balzac, George Sand and Friedrich Schiller into Russian.

Books by Fyodor Dostoevsky

Crime and Punishment
Added to basket
The Brothers Karamazov
Added to basket
The Idiot
Added to basket
£8.99
Paperback
The House of the Dead
Added to basket
Demons
Added to basket
£10.99
Paperback
Poor Folk and Other Stories
Added to basket
The Gambler and Other Stories
Added to basket
The Village of Stepanchikovo
Added to basket
Notes From Underground
Added to basket
The Meek One
Added to basket
£2.00
Paperback

Gift Editions

Crime and Punishment
Added to basket
Crime And Punishment
Added to basket