Visit our Christmas Gift Finder
Women Becoming Mathematicians: Creating a Professional Identity in Post-World War II America - The MIT Press (Hardback)
  • Women Becoming Mathematicians: Creating a Professional Identity in Post-World War II America - The MIT Press (Hardback)
zoom

Women Becoming Mathematicians: Creating a Professional Identity in Post-World War II America - The MIT Press (Hardback)

(author)
£9.95
Hardback 304 Pages / Published: 01/08/2000
  • Not available

This product is currently unavailable.

  • This item has been added to your basket

Women mathematicians of the 1950s, 1960s, and 1970s and how they built professional identities in the face of social and institutional obstacles.

Women Becoming Mathematicians looks at the lives and careers of thirty-six of the approximately two hundred women who earned Ph.D.s in mathematics from American institutions from 1940 to 1959. During this period, American mathematical research enjoyed an unprecedented expansion, fueled by the technological successes of World War II and the postwar boom in federal funding for education in the basic sciences. Yet women's share of doctorates earned in mathematics in the United States reached an all-time low. This book explores the complex interplay between the personal and professional lives of those women who embarked on mathematical careers during this period, with a view to understanding how changes in American society during the 1950s, 1960s, and 1970s affected their career development and identities as mathematicians. The book is based on extensive interviews with thirty-six women mathematicians of the postwar generation, as well as primary and secondary historical and sociological research. Taking a life-course approach, the book examines the development of mathematical identity across the life span, from childhood through adulthood and into retirement. It focuses on the process by which women who are actively involved in the mathematical community come to "know themselves" as mathematicians. The women's stories are instructive precisely because they do not conform to a set pattern; compelled to improvise, the women mathematicians of the 1940s and 1950s followed diverse paths in their struggle to construct a professional identity in postwar America.

Publisher: MIT Press Ltd
ISBN: 9780262133692
Number of pages: 304
Weight: 544 g
Dimensions: 229 x 152 x 19 mm

You may also be interested in...

Fermat's Last Theorem
Added to basket
The Man Who Changed Everything
Added to basket
The Information
Added to basket
£12.99
Paperback
Plutonium
Added to basket
£13.99
Paperback
Physics
Added to basket
£9.99
Paperback
Nothing: A Very Short Introduction
Added to basket
The Science Book
Added to basket
DK
£17.99
Hardback
Einstein
Added to basket
£10.99
Paperback
Revolution in Mind
Added to basket
£12.00
Paperback
The Lunar Men
Added to basket
£14.99
Paperback
The Venetian Empire
Added to basket
£9.99
Paperback
The Age of Wonder
Added to basket
£12.99
Paperback
Quantum
Added to basket
£10.99
Paperback

Please sign in to write a review

Your review has been submitted successfully.