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Uninformed Why People Seem to Know So Little about Politics and What We Can Do about It (Hardback)
  • Uninformed Why People Seem to Know So Little about Politics and What We Can Do about It (Hardback)
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Uninformed Why People Seem to Know So Little about Politics and What We Can Do about It (Hardback)

(author)
£23.99
Hardback 360 Pages / Published: 07/01/2016
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Citizens appear to know very little about politics and government. Hundreds of surveys document millions of citizens answering thousands of political questions incorrectly. Given this state of affairs, it is not surprising that more knowledgeable people often deride the public for its ignorance and encourage them to stay out of politics. As the eminent political scientist Arthur Lupia shows in this capstone work, there are more constructive responses. As he explains, expert critics of public ignorance fundamentally misunderstand the problem, and as a consequence propose unhelpful solutions to a genuinely serious problem. For instance, idea that simply providing people with more facts will make them more competent voters is erroneous. That is because most experts fail to understand how most people learn, and do not know how to determine what types of information are relevant to voters. Lupia has worked for years with scientists and educators in all arenas to figure out how to increase issue competence among voters in areas like climate change. He draws from these efforts and the latest research on educational efficacy to develop a battery of techniques that effectively convey to people information that they actually care. If we accept the idea that citizens sometimes lack the knowledge that they need to make competent political choices, that greater knowledge can improve decision making, and that experts and advocates are often mistaken about how people think and learn, then a prescription for improving political knowledge and civic competence emerges: we need to educate the educators. Lupia's ultimate purpose, therefore, extends beyond politics alone: to help educators of all kinds convey information that is of more value to more people.

Publisher: Oxford University Press Inc
ISBN: 9780190263720
Number of pages: 360
Weight: 600 g
Dimensions: 235 x 163 x 29 mm


MEDIA REVIEWS

"Lupia has spent his professional lifetime mastering the art, the science, in his hands, of education in the broadest sense. He has much to offer and does so supremely. Uninformed is not only an excellent guide to educating people about politics, but also an instruction manual in pedagogy more broadly."
--John Aldrich, Pfizer-Pratt University Professor of Political Science, Duke University


"We are regularly invited (in some countries required) to make crucial decisions--mainly at elections when we can influence who rules for the next period but also, in some places at least, other aspects of society, as at referendums. So what information do we have when we approach those decisions? What information should we have? And what knowledge frameworks (theories? ideologies?) should we lodge and manipulate that information in--how do we use the information to best effect? Addressing those two questions is at the heart of Lupia's book: in order to be competent citizens what information and knowledge frameworks should "educators" ensure that we have, so that we can draw on relevant information when making a decision and use it to make reasoned decisions?"
--H-Net Reviews


"Why don't more voters come forward to support-or reject-new laws and regulations that would directly affect them? In his new book, lUninformed: Why People Seem to Know So Little About Politics and What We Can Do About It, political scientist Arthur Lupia argues that it's a matter of education. And America's key influencers, he writes, should address this-by making things personal. Rather than focusing on how an environmental regulation might slightly change the temperature on a polar ice cap, for example, Lupia contends that journalists, teachers and advocates should explain how it will save a local elementary school from ending up underwater. Once voters are hooked on a big-picture concept, it's easier to get them engaged with the details of a law, rule or regulation-and take informed action to help it pass, fail or evolve."
--Time Magazine


"In Uninformed, Lupia provides sightlines for educators to ... add new voices of reason, inflections of passion, and perhaps, murmurs of compromise to our political discourse."
--Science




"Lupia has spent his professional lifetime mastering the art, the science, in his hands, of education in the broadest sense. He has much to offer and does so supremely. Uninformed is not only an excellent guide to educating people about politics, but also an instruction manual in pedagogy more broadly." --John Aldrich, Pfizer-Pratt University Professor of Political Science, Duke University


"Lupia presents solutions to improve the interaction and communication strategies of those who would seek to improve citizens' political knowledge..." --Science


"Why don't more voters come forward to support-or reject-new laws and regulations that would directly affect them? In his new book, lUninformed: Why People Seem to Know So Little About Politics and What We Can Do About It, political scientist Arthur Lupia argues that it's a matter of education. And America's key influencers, he writes, should address this-by making things personal. Rather than focusing on how an environmental regulation might slightly change the temperature on a polar ice cap, for example, Lupia contends that journalists, teachers and advocates should explain how it will save a local elementary school from ending up underwater. Once voters are hooked on a big-picture concept, it's easier to get them engaged with the details of a law, rule or regulation-and take informed action to help it pass, fail or evolve." --Time Magazine


"In Uninformed, Lupia provides sightlines for educators to ... add new voices of reason, inflections of passion, and perhaps, murmurs of compromise to our political discourse."
--Science


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