Treatment without Consent: Law, Psychiatry and the Treatment of Mentally Disordered People Since 1845 - Social Ethics and Policy (Hardback)
  • Treatment without Consent: Law, Psychiatry and the Treatment of Mentally Disordered People Since 1845 - Social Ethics and Policy (Hardback)

Treatment without Consent: Law, Psychiatry and the Treatment of Mentally Disordered People Since 1845 - Social Ethics and Policy (Hardback)

£95.00
Hardback Published: 21/12/1995
  • We can order this

Usually despatched within 3 weeks

  • This item has been added to your basket

Check Marketplace availability

Phil Fennell's tightly argued study traces the history of treatment of mental disorder in Britain over the last 150 years. He focuses specifically on treatment of mental disorder without consent within psychiatric practice, and on the legal position which has allowed it. Treatment Without Consent examines many controversial areas: the use of high-strength drugs and Electro Convulsive Therapy, physical restraint and the vexed issue of the sterilisation of people with learning disabilities. Changing notions of consent are discussed, from the common perception that relatives are able to consent on behalf of the patient, to present-day statutory and common law rules, and recent Law Commission recommendations. This work brings a complex and intriguing area to life; it includes a table of legal sources and an extensive bibliography. It is essential reading for historians, lawyers and all those who are interested in the treatment of mental disorder.

Publisher: Taylor & Francis Ltd
ISBN: 9780415077873

You may also be interested in...

Your review has been submitted successfully.

We would love to hear what you think of Waterstones. Why not review Waterstones on Trustpilot?


Review us on Trustpilot