Click & Collect
from 2 Hours*
Last Christmas
delivery dates
Free UK Standard Delivery On all orders over £25 Order in time for Christmas 19th December 2nd Class |
21st December by 3pm 1st Class
Free Click & Collect to shops From 2 hours after you order*
Tokyo: A Metropolis as a Self Organizing System (Hardback)
  • Tokyo: A Metropolis as a Self Organizing System (Hardback)
zoom

Tokyo: A Metropolis as a Self Organizing System (Hardback)

(author), (author of introduction)
£24.90
Hardback 60 Pages / Published: 05/07/2009
  • We can order this from the publisher

UK delivery within 3-4 weeks

  • This item has been added to your basket
Cities are often seen as symbols of order: the existence of city walls, fortified gates, palaces, temples, roads, pavements, highways, public institutions, city centers and residential areas is interpreted as indicating the existence of a central authority that plans and controls the city. On the other hand, the very same cities are also seen as symbols of chaos, disorder and spontaneous growth. The little winding streets and alleys, the mixture of physical structures, styles and human activities have often given the impression that cities, like forests, and other natural entities are organic structures - strange, natural artefacts. Tokyo is a good example for this dual nature of cities. When you first encounter it, you get the impression of chaos: old buildings with one or two storeys next to 30-, 40- or 50-storey skyscrapers; pedestrians, cars, trains moving in all directions, each with its own trajectory and so on. But then you realise that this seemingly chaotic structure provides a context for perfectly ordered human activities: trains leave and arrive as timetabled, their doors open at the exact points that are marked with yellow lines on the platforms, every morning after midnight fishermen bring their catch to Tokyo's big fish market, auctions are held, and by six o'clock in the morning this huge amount of sea food has already been distributed among thousands of restaurants all over the city. And if you look deeper you learn that the chaotic face of Tokyo is the pre-condition for its ordered and organised life. Complexity theory or self-organisation theory are umbrella terms for a set of theories that study the interplay between chaos and order. Originating in the sciences, these theories have been applied to the study of cities in the last three decades. They show that as in natural systems, in the artificial systems that we call cities, chaos and order do not stand in opposition to each other. Rather, they coexist in an ongoing interplay of circular causality: chaos is the precondition for new urban orders to emerge and then to reproduce themselves, whereas order and organisation set the boundaries within which chaotic structures and behaviours can take place.

Publisher: Edition Axel Menges
ISBN: 9783936681277
Number of pages: 60
Weight: 808 g
Dimensions: 280 x 300 x 10 mm

You may also be interested in...

Time and Social Theory
Added to basket
£17.99
Paperback
Space And Place
Added to basket
£19.99
Paperback
A Guide to Countries of the World
Added to basket
The City: The Basics
Added to basket
The Making Of The British Landscape
Added to basket
Cities Are Good for You
Added to basket
Europe and the People Without History
Added to basket
Gold
Added to basket
£70.00
Hardback
Land of Pure Vision
Added to basket
Diaspora: A Very Short Introduction
Added to basket
The Dictionary of Human Geography 5e
Added to basket
A Dictionary of Geography
Added to basket
The Middle East Water Question
Added to basket
Introducing Human Geographies
Added to basket
Qatar
Added to basket
£17.99
Paperback

Please sign in to write a review

Your review has been submitted successfully.