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Through Ebony Eyes: What Teachers Need to Know But Are Afraid to Ask About African American Students (Paperback)
  • Through Ebony Eyes: What Teachers Need to Know But Are Afraid to Ask About African American Students (Paperback)
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Through Ebony Eyes: What Teachers Need to Know But Are Afraid to Ask About African American Students (Paperback)

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£12.99
Paperback 348 Pages / Published: 08/05/2007
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In this book, Gail L. Thompson takes on the volatile topic of the role of race in education and explores the black-white achievement gap and the cultural divide that exists between some teachers and African American students. Solidly based on research conducted with 175 educators, Through Ebony Eyes provides information and strategies that will help teachers increase their effectiveness with African American students. Written in conversational language, Through Ebony Eyes offers a wealth of examples and personal stories that clearly demonstrate the cultural differences that exist in the schools and offers a three-part, long-term professional development plan that will help teachers become more effective.

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons Inc
ISBN: 9780787987695
Number of pages: 348
Weight: 434 g
Dimensions: 228 x 156 x 26 mm


MEDIA REVIEWS
Fifty years after "Brown v. Board of Education, educator Thompson finds the public schools system continues " to grapple with issues pertaining to race and ethnicity." Prompted by this observation and concerns about the achievement gap between black and white students, Thompson set out to help prospective and current teachers " increase their efficacy with African-American students, " particularly those in urban areas. Thompson ("African American Teens Discuss Their Schooling Experiences; etc.) doggedly tackles the multiple theories educators have proposed to explain the achievement gap. Among them are the " low teacher expectation" theory, in which students are confronted by teachers who think little of their chances for success, and the " acting white" theory, in which some black students " infer that they have to reject their home culture to succeed academically." While Thompson supports these theories, she comes down harshly on the " parents-are-at-fault theory, " insisting " most African-American parents do care about their children's education." The author explores the observation that " poor children and children of color... are more likely than others to end up with underqualified and ineffective teachers." Although Thompson spends a considerable amount of time complaining and calling on research and statistics, she also shares triumphs and challenges from her own days as a student. She offers advice, stressing the importance of " reminding students of the big picture" and the value of their education, and advising teachers to use hypothetical questions to sparkdiscussion and showcase students' talent, acts that are important for boosting esteem in all children, regardless of color. "(May) ("Publishers Weekly, April 5, 2004)
Fifty years after "Brown v. Board of Education," educator Thompson finds the public schools system continues " to grapple with issues pertaining to race and ethnicity." Prompted by this observation and concerns about the achievement gap between black and white students, Thompson set out to help prospective and current teachers " increase their efficacy with African-American students, " particularly those in urban areas. Thompson ("African American Teens Discuss Their Schooling Experiences"; etc.) doggedly tackles the multiple theories educators have proposed to explain the achievement gap. Among them are the " low teacher expectation" theory, in which students are confronted by teachers who think little of their chances for success, and the " acting white" theory, in which some black students " infer that they have to reject their home culture to succeed academically." While Thompson supports these theories, she comes down harshly on the " parents-are-at-fault theory, " insisting " most African-American parents do care about their children's education." The author explores the observation that " poor children and children of color... are more likely than others to end up with underqualified and ineffective teachers." Although Thompson spends a considerable amount of time complaining and calling on research and statistics, she also shares triumphs and challenges from her own days as a student. She offers advice, stressing the importance of " reminding students of the big picture" and the value of their education, and advising teachers to use hypothetical questions to sparkdiscussion and showcase students' talent, acts that are important for boosting esteem in all children, regardless of color. "(May)" ("Publishers Weekly," April 5, 2004)

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