The Who, What, and Where of America: Understanding the American Community Survey - County and City Extra Series (Hardback)
  • The Who, What, and Where of America: Understanding the American Community Survey - County and City Extra Series (Hardback)
zoom

The Who, What, and Where of America: Understanding the American Community Survey - County and City Extra Series (Hardback)

(editor), (editor)
£80.00
Hardback 400 Pages / Published: 27/05/2014
  • We can order this

Usually dispatched within 3 weeks

  • This item has been added to your basket
The Who, What, and Where of America Understanding the American Community Survey Part of Bernan Press's County and City Extra Series In the fall of 2013, the Census Bureau released data from the American Community Survey (ACS) one-year (2012) and three-year (2010-2012) estimates for the United States. The ACS replaced the decennial census long form in 2010 and now collects long-form-type information on a continuing basis rather than every 10 years, providing more current data. The ACS provides a regular stream of updated information for states and local areas and has revolutionized the way we use data to understand our communities. It produces social, housing, and economic characteristics for demographic groups.

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield
ISBN: 9781598887099
Number of pages: 400
Weight: 1184 g
Dimensions: 286 x 224 x 26 mm
Edition: Fourth Edition


MEDIA REVIEWS
Like the decennial census, the American Community Survey (ACS ) is conducted by the U.S. Census Bureau. While the decennial census provides the official counts of people for congressional apportionment, the ACS measures the changing social and economic characteristics of the U.S. population. The ACS provides annual data for states, metropolitan statistical areas, and large cities as plus three-year data for mid-size communities. This volume reports social and economic changes in the U.S. since the 2010 census. The data are divided into three parts titled 'Who,' 'What,' and 'Where.' Under 'Who' we find statistics as to age, race/ethnicity, and household structure (e.g., married, living alone). Under 'What' we find tables on education, employment, and income. Under 'Where' we find information on migration, housing, and transportation. Each part is prefaced with text highlighting significant findings and ranking tables showing state divergences from the national norm. The statistical tables are organized by states, counties, MSAs, and populations of 20,000 or more. There are also Web resources to dig deeper into the data and to understand the collection methodology. The appendixes include a glossary and definitions of the terms used in the survey instrument. The value of the ACS is the ability to compare data from different geographic areas within the same time frame. As an example of the richness of the resource, we can see how many people have moved recently and where they moved to. Nationally 85 percent of Americans lived in the same home they did one year ago. Of those who did move, 5.2 percent stayed in the same city, 4.3 percent left that city but stayed in the same county, 3.1 percent moved to a different county in the same state, and 2.2 percent moved to a different state. Nevada had the highest proportion of movers (22.8 percent) and New Jersey the lowest at (9.6 percent). This reference is helpful for crafting business plans, determining expansion strategies, as well as for public policy discussions. * American Reference Books Annual *
Although the aim of the U.S. Census is to count people, the American Community Survey (ACS) aims to drill down to the characteristics of those people. This reference source highlights and offers general information from the ACS and offer comparisons of statistics across time periods and geographic areas. Narrative sections give users a sense of what the ACS entails as well as an overview of 'Who: Age, Race/Ethnicity, and Households'; 'What: Education, Employment, and Income'; and 'Where: Migration, Housing, and Transportation.' The tables in each section are basic and easy to use. There is information included on the sources of the statistics as well as on the ACS itself. This would be a useful resource for libraries that find themselves in need of population information. * Booklist *

You may also be interested in...

Heuristic Research
Added to basket
A Teacher's Guide to Classroom Research
Added to basket
Qualitative Researching
Added to basket
Research Methods
Added to basket
£39.99
Paperback
Designing Social Inquiry
Added to basket
Blood Rites
Added to basket
£9.99
Paperback
Cartoon Guide to Statistics
Added to basket
The Foundations of Research
Added to basket
How to Design and Report Experiments
Added to basket
Decolonizing Methodologies
Added to basket
Qualitative Research Practice
Added to basket
Action Research in Education
Added to basket

Reviews

Please sign in to write a review

Your review has been submitted successfully.