The Short Life of Free Georgia: Class and Slavery in the Colonial South (Paperback)
  • The Short Life of Free Georgia: Class and Slavery in the Colonial South (Paperback)
zoom

The Short Life of Free Georgia: Class and Slavery in the Colonial South (Paperback)

(author)
£30.50
Paperback 176 Pages / Published: 30/10/2015
  • We can order this

Usually dispatched within 2 weeks

  • This item has been added to your basket
For twenty years in the eighteenth century, Georgia - the last British colony in what became the United States - enjoyed a brief period of free labor, where workers were not enslaved and were paid. The Trustees for the Establishment of the Colony of Georgia created a ""Georgia experiment"" of philanthropic enterprise and moral reform for poor white workers, though rebellious settlers were more interested in shaking off the British social system of deference to the upper class. Only a few elites in the colony actually desired the slave system, but those men, backed by expansionist South Carolina planters, used the laborers' demands for high wages as examples of societal unrest. Through a campaign of disinformation in London, they argued for slavery, eventually convincing the Trustees to abandon their experiment.

In The Short Life of Free Georgia, Noeleen McIlvenna chronicles the years between 1732 and 1752 and challenges the conventional view that Georgia's colonial purpose was based on unworkable assumptions and utopian ideals. Rather, Georgia largely succeeded in its goals - until self-interested parties convinced England that Georgia had failed, leading to the colony's transformation into a replica of slaveholding South Carolina.

Publisher: The University of North Carolina Press
ISBN: 9781469624037
Number of pages: 176
Weight: 525 g
Dimensions: 235 x 155 x 12 mm


MEDIA REVIEWS
Meticulous, historically sound, and presented in a readable and engaging manner." --Civil War News


McIlvenna tells a complex, multilayerd story of Georgia's beginning in six chronological chapters that include details from a wide range of primary sources.--Journal of Southern History


A retelling of the thirteenth colony's trustee era (1732-1752) from the standpoint of the settlement's poor, white, and socially irreverent majority.--Journal of American History


A meticulously researched and essential contribution to the study of slavery and society in the colonial South.--H-Net


Successfully demonstrates that class, not race, was the defining component of early Georgian society.--Choice


McIlvenna's expert comparative analysis of primary sources allows for a complex picture to emerge. . . . Social history at its finest, and certainly the first book of its kind to point a lens at the complex political, social, and economic climate that marked early free Georgia.--Augusta Genealogy


Provide[s] valuable accounts of the development of the economy of early Georgia.--New Perspectives on the Eighteenth Century

You may also be interested in...

White Gold
Added to basket
£10.99
Paperback
King Leopold's Ghost
Added to basket
The Black Jacobins
Added to basket
Rough Crossings
Added to basket
£14.99
Paperback
A Short History of Slavery
Added to basket
Up from Slavery
Added to basket
Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl
Added to basket
American Slavery
Added to basket
£12.99
Paperback
William Wilberforce
Added to basket
The History of Mary Prince
Added to basket
The Slave Trade
Added to basket
£20.00
Paperback
On Slavery and Abolitionism
Added to basket
Twelve Years a Slave
Added to basket

Reviews

Please sign in to write a review

Your review has been submitted successfully.