The People’s Courts: Pursuing Judicial Independence in America (Hardback)
  • The People’s Courts: Pursuing Judicial Independence in America (Hardback)
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The People’s Courts: Pursuing Judicial Independence in America (Hardback)

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£36.95
Hardback 400 Pages
Published: 27/02/2012
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In the United States, almost 90 percent of state judges have to run in popular elections to remain on the bench. In the past decade, this peculiarly American institution has produced vicious multi-million-dollar political election campaigns and high-profile allegations of judicial bias and misconduct. The People’s Courts traces the history of judicial elections and Americans’ quest for an independent judiciary—one that would ensure fairness for all before the law—from the colonial era to the present.

In the aftermath of economic disaster, nineteenth-century reformers embraced popular elections as a way to make politically appointed judges less susceptible to partisan patronage and more independent of the legislative and executive branches of government. This effort to reinforce the separation of powers and limit government succeeded in many ways, but it created new threats to judicial independence and provoked further calls for reform. Merit selection emerged as the most promising means of reducing partisan and financial influence from judicial selection. It too, however, proved vulnerable to pressure from party politics and special interest groups. Yet, as Shugerman concludes, it still has more potential for protecting judicial independence than either political appointment or popular election.

The People’s Courts shows how Americans have been deeply committed to judicial independence, but that commitment has also been manipulated by special interests. By understanding our history of judicial selection, we can better protect and preserve the independence of judges from political and partisan influence.

Publisher: Harvard University Press
ISBN: 9780674055483
Number of pages: 400
Dimensions: 235 x 156 mm


MEDIA REVIEWS

This is an important book on a vastly important topic--the indispensable source for anyone interested in how the United States arrived at the 'peculiar institution' of judicial elections. - John Fabian Witt, Yale Law School

The People's Courts is the first comprehensive history of judicial elections, an exciting work that sharply challenges how we usually think about courts, constitutionalism, and democracy. For a long time to come this is going to be the definitive book on elected judiciaries. - Robert W. Gordon, Stanford Law School

A powerfully framed and comprehensive exploration of how judges and politicians (often politician-judges) responded to the apparent tensions between popular democracy and judicial independence. The People's Courts will be essential reading for everyone interested in the political history of the judiciary. - Hendrik Hartog, Princeton University

Shugerman looks at changes in how judges have been appointed and elected over the years, and how battles over judges and judicial elections have increased in recent years...Well worth reading for those interested in legal history as well as for those interested in how politics and society shape the legal system. - S. A. Merriman, Choice

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