The Material Unconscious: American Amusement, Stephen Crane, and the Economics of Play (Paperback)
  • The Material Unconscious: American Amusement, Stephen Crane, and the Economics of Play (Paperback)
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The Material Unconscious: American Amusement, Stephen Crane, and the Economics of Play (Paperback)

(author)
£45.95
Paperback 384 Pages
Published: 01/02/1997
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Within the ephemera of the everyday--old photographs, circus posters, iron toys--lies a challenge to America's dominant cultural memory. What this memory has left behind, Bill Brown recovers in the "material unconscious" of Stephen Crane's work, the textual residues of daily sensations that add up to a new history of the American 1890s. As revealed in Crane's disavowing appropriation of an emerging mass culture--from football games and freak shows to roller coasters and early cinema--the decade reappears as an underexposed moment in the genealogy of modernism and modernity.

Brown's story begins on the Jersey Shore, in Asbury Park, where Crane became a writer in the shadow of his father, a grimly serious Methodist minister who vilified the popular amusements his son adored. The coastal resorts became the stage for debates about technology, about the body's visibility, about a black service class and the new mass access to leisure. From this snapshot of a recreational scene that would continue to inspire Crane's sensational modernism, Brown takes us to New York's Bowery. There, in the visual culture established by dime museums, minstrel shows, and the Kodak craze, he exhibits Crane dramatically obscuring the typology of race.

Along the way, Brown demonstrates how attitudes toward play transformed the image of war, the idea of childhood and nationhood, and the concept of culture itself. And by developing a new conceptual apparatus (with such notions as "recreational time," "abstract leisure," and the "amusement/knowledge system"), he provides the groundwork for a new politics of pleasure. A crucial theorization of how cultural studies can and should proceed, The Material Unconscious insists that in the very conjuncture of canonical literature and mass culture, we can best understand how proliferating and competing economies of play disrupt the so-called "logic" and "work" of culture.

Publisher: Harvard University Press
ISBN: 9780674553811
Number of pages: 384
Weight: 544 g
Dimensions: 235 x 156 mm


MEDIA REVIEWS

Brown offers not only breathtaking readings of individual works but an argument that Crane's modernism derives precisely from the penetration into his corpus of the objects of mass culture. The result is not only a splendid book on Crane, but a powerful reinterpretation of turn-of-the-century American culture and politics. - Michael Rogin, University of California, Berkeley

In trying to rethink the relations between material, intellectual and literary history, Bill Brown has produced an adventurously researched and especially rich cultural diagnosis of [Stephen] Crane's America. His diagnosis understands that history's most effective force in literature is to linger on obliquely in ghostly form, pleading its case with some shyness from that hollow place which echoes material life. We know it by its ephemeral shadow. - Ian F. A. Bell, American Studies [UK]

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