The Manchester Trolleybus (Hardback)
  • The Manchester Trolleybus (Hardback)
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The Manchester Trolleybus (Hardback)

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Hardback Published: 07/02/2008
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By the early 1930s, the tide had turned against tramways in Britain and one of the systems that was under threat was that of Manchester. Although its manager, Stuart Pilcher, had constructed new trams as late as 1932, by the middle of the decade it became evident that, as far as Pilcher and his Transport Committee were concerned, the future of the city's public transport lay with the motor bus. However, the Council, which at that stage also owned the power station which provided the electricity for the trams, disagreed and, in 1935, rejected proposals to convert the Ashton Old Road route to bus operation preferring to seek powers, despite the manager's opposition, to operate trolleybuses. Thus, on 1 March 1938, Manchester joined the ranks of Britain's trolleybus operators.Further routes were converted although World War 2 caused the delay in the final tramway conversions and this, combined with the nationalisation of the city's power station after the war, meant that trolleybuses in the city were never to reach their true potential. In neighbouring Ashton, however, the story was different; an enthusiastic trolleybus operator from the mid-1920s, Ashton developed a network of routes that was eventually closely interlinked with those of Manchester, with joint services between the two. Although new vehicles were acquired as late as 1956 by both operators, fashion turned against trolleybuses in Britain and operation in Manchester and Ashton ceased at the end of 1966. By the early 1930s, the tide had turned against tramways in Britain and one of the systems that was under threat was that of Manchester.Although its manager, Stuart Pilcher, had constructed new trams as late as 1932, by the middle of the decade it became evident that, as far as Pilcher and his Transport Committee were concerned, the future of the city's public transport lay with the motor bus. However, the Council, which at that stage also owned the power station which provided the electricity for the trams, disagreed and, in 1935, rejected proposals to convert the Ashton Old Road route to bus operation preferring to seek powers, despite the manager's opposition, to operate trolleybuses. Thus, on 1 March 1938, Manchester joined the ranks of Britain's trolleybus operators. Further routes were converted although World War 2 caused the delay in the final tramway conversions and this, combined with the nationalisation of the city's power station after the war, meant that trolleybuses in the city were never to reach their true potential.In neighbouring Ashton, however, the story was different; an enthusiastic trolleybus operator from the mid-1920s, Ashton developed a network of routes that was eventually closely interlinked with those of Manchester, with joint services between the two. Although new vehicles were acquired as late as 1956 by both operators, fashion turned against trolleybuses in Britain and operation in Manchester and Ashton ceased at the end of 1966.

Publisher: Ian Allan Publishing
ISBN: 9780711032453
Weight: 708 g
Dimensions: 282 x 213 x 13 mm

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