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The Law and Religious Market Theory: China, Taiwan and Hong Kong (Hardback)
  • The Law and Religious Market Theory: China, Taiwan and Hong Kong (Hardback)
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The Law and Religious Market Theory: China, Taiwan and Hong Kong (Hardback)

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£85.00
Hardback 244 Pages / Published: 12/10/2017
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With comparative case studies from China, Taiwan and Hong Kong, Jianlin Chen's new work offers a fresh, descriptive and normative perspective on law and religion. This presentation of the original law and religious market theory employs an interdisciplinary approach that sheds light on this subject for scholars in legal and sociological disciplines. It sets out the precise nature of religious competition envisaged by the current legal regimes in the three jurisdictions and analyses how certain restrictions on religious practices may facilitate normatively desirable market dynamics. This updated and invaluable resource provides a new and insightful investigation into this fascinating area of law and religion in Greater China today.

Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9781107170179
Number of pages: 244
Weight: 480 g
Dimensions: 235 x 156 x 17 mm


MEDIA REVIEWS
'A brilliant and essential read for those interested in exploring the complex and multifaceted ways in which law and religion interact. Chen does a masterful job elucidating the situation in China, Hong Kong and Taiwan, yet his work is relevant to the relationship between law and religion around the globe. I am not generally a fan of the 'market' approach to understanding law or religion, but the way in which Chen uses that approach to shine a light on the deeper interaction between law and religion and the many problems with the concept of neutrality is enlightening. Simply put, this book is a must read for all law and religion scholars.' Frank S. Ravitch, Michigan State University College of Law
`A brilliant and essential read for those interested in exploring the complex and multifaceted ways in which law and religion interact. Chen does a masterful job elucidating the situation in China, Hong Kong and Taiwan, yet his work is relevant to the relationship between law and religion around the globe. I am not generally a fan of the `market' approach to understanding law or religion, but the way in which Chen uses that approach to shine a light on the deeper interaction between law and religion and the many problems with the concept of neutrality is enlightening. Simply put, this book is a must read for all law and religion scholars.' Frank S. Ravitch, Michigan State University College of Law

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