Visit our Christmas Gift Finder
Click & Collect from 2 Hours*
Free Delivery to UK Shops
Free UK Standard Delivery On all orders £20 and over Free Delivery to UK Shops Local shops and expert booksellers nationwide Free Click & Collect to UK shops From 2 hours of your order*
The Indian Craze: Primitivism, Modernism, and Transculturation in American Art, 1890-1915 - Objects/Histories (Paperback)
  • The Indian Craze: Primitivism, Modernism, and Transculturation in American Art, 1890-1915 - Objects/Histories (Paperback)
zoom

The Indian Craze: Primitivism, Modernism, and Transculturation in American Art, 1890-1915 - Objects/Histories (Paperback)

(author)
£22.99
Paperback 304 Pages / Published: 23/03/2009
  • In stock online
  • Free UK delivery

Usually dispatched within 24 hours

  • This item has been added to your basket
Your local Waterstones may have stock of this item. Please check by using Click & Collect
In the early twentieth century, Native American baskets, blankets, and bowls could be purchased from department stores, "Indian stores," dealers, and the U.S. government's Indian schools. Men and women across the United States indulged in a widespread passion for collecting Native American art, which they displayed in domestic nooks called "Indian corners." Elizabeth Hutchinson identifies this collecting as part of a larger "Indian craze" and links it to other activities such as the inclusion of Native American artifacts in art exhibitions sponsored by museums, arts and crafts societies, and World's Fairs, and the use of indigenous handicrafts as models for non-Native artists exploring formal abstraction and emerging notions of artistic subjectivity. She argues that the Indian craze convinced policymakers that art was an aspect of "traditional" Native culture worth preserving, an attitude that continues to influence popular attitudes and federal legislation.

Illustrating her argument with images culled from late-nineteenth- and early-twentieth-century publications, Hutchinson revises the standard history of the mainstream interest in Native American material culture as "art." While many locate the development of this cross-cultural interest in the Southwest after the First World War, Hutchinson reveals that it began earlier and spread across the nation from west to east and from reservation to metropolis. She demonstrates that artists, teachers, and critics associated with the development of American modernism, including Arthur Wesley Dow and Gertrude Kasebier, were inspired by Native art. Native artists were also able to achieve some recognition as modern artists, as Hutchinson shows through her discussion of the Winnebago painter and educator Angel DeCora. By taking a transcultural approach, Hutchinson transforms our understanding of the role of Native Americans in modernist culture.

Publisher: Duke University Press
ISBN: 9780822344087
Number of pages: 304
Weight: 726 g
Dimensions: 254 x 178 x 20 mm


MEDIA REVIEWS
"While the experience of modernism in less urban western places was no doubt different, modernism still must have been present. Without the insights of Hutchinson's book, however, historians could not even begin to identify modernism in rural America at the turn of the twentieth century. In short, The Indian Craze is a potentially paradigm-shifting book, one that will force new discussions of who participates in the modern world and how."
- Flannery Burke, Journal of American History
"The Indian Craze revives a politically charged and artistically productive era, while challenging the binarism modern/antimodern art. . . . As Hutchinson effortlessly engages with the discourse on modernity, she also mindfully reveals that Native American art in all its forms is not a subclass of America's art history, but is, in fact, part of its continuum, which early and substantially contributed to the 'conversation' about what counts as American art." - Linda M. Waggoner, Great Plains Quarterly
"Hutchinson's study demonstrates superior scholarship. It is detailed and nuanced and builds a complex and convincing argument. The Indian Craze provides a welcome and highly readable addition to the existing scholarship on this period." - Jennifer McLerran, Journal of Arizona History
"The Indian Craze is an important addition to the art histories of Native North America and the United States alike. Hutchinson convincingly argues that the Anglo art world's interest in Native American art and culture predates World War I, a few decades earlier than has generally been considered. . . . The Indian Craze shows us the innumerable benefits of attempting the difficult reconstruction of Native voices." - John Ott, Visual Resources
"The stakes and interest of this excellent study go much beyond the limits of its specific historic topic, the sudden fashion of Native American art around 1900. . . . Hutchinson's book will provide the reader with many valuable insights in mainly three fields. . . . First, it offers a careful and well-balanced description of what the Indian craze actually meant. . . . Second, the book is also a key contribution to a new understanding of modernism in Western art and culture. . . . Third, Indian Craze is also a major contribution to the issue of transcultural hybridization." - Jan Baetens, Leonardo
"Hutchinson's framework of cultural contextualization makes this a dynamic look at a compelling (and under-researched) topic. Illustrated with both black and white and color plates, this book is recommended for academic and non-academic audiences interested in the topics of American art, Native art, education, racial politics, or American history. It is a book that will spark curiosity and serve as the basis for future scholarship."
- Heather Kline, ARLIS/NA Reviews
"The Indian Craze is a lucid and compelling account of the entangled histories of Native and European-American aesthetic and intersubjective exchange in the formative years of American modernism. Told with deep historical understanding, it restores subjecthood and agency to Native artists too often deprived of both by the persistence of primitivizing attitudes. Such studies as Elizabeth Hutchinson's offer a very different, insistently hybrid history of modernism, sensitive to the ethical ambiguities that reside in virtually every instance of uneven encounter between colonizer and colonized. This is a long-awaited contribution to how we understand the complex cultural negotiations attendant on the growing aesthetic value accorded to Native arts around the turn-of-the-century."-Angela Miller, lead author of American Encounters: Art, History, and Cultural Identity
"The Indian Craze is not only a delight to read; it is a major contribution to American visual cultural studies. Wearing her erudition lightly, Elizabeth Hutchinson participates in and adds appreciably to the transcultural critiques that so many of us are interested in now."-Janet C. Berlo, co-author of Native North American Art
"The Indian Craze is an important addition to the art histories of Native North America and the United States alike. Hutchinson convincingly argues that the Anglo art world's interest in Native American art and culture predates World War I, a few decades earlier than has generally been considered. . . . The Indian Craze shows us the innumerable benefits of attempting the difficult reconstruction of Native voices." -- John Ott * Visual Resources *
"The Indian Craze revives a politically charged and artistically productive era, while challenging the binarism modern/antimodern art. . . . As Hutchinson effortlessly engages with the discourse on modernity, she also mindfully reveals that Native American art in all its forms is not a subclass of America's art history, but is, in fact, part of its continuum, which early and substantially contributed to the 'conversation' about what counts as American art." -- Linda M. Waggoner * Great Plains Quarterly *
"Hutchinson's framework of cultural contextualization makes this a dynamic look at a compelling (and under-researched) topic. Illustrated with both black and white and color plates, this book is recommended for academic and non-academic audiences interested in the topics of American art, Native art, education, racial politics, or American history. It is a book that will spark curiosity and serve as the basis for future scholarship."
-- Heather Kline * ARLIS/NA Reviews *
"Hutchinson's study demonstrates superior scholarship. It is detailed and nuanced and builds a complex and convincing argument. The Indian Craze provides a welcome and highly readable addition to the existing scholarship on this period." -- Jennifer McLerran * Journal of Arizona History *
"The stakes and interest of this excellent study go much beyond the limits of its specific historic topic, the sudden fashion of Native American art around 1900. . . . Hutchinson's book will provide the reader with many valuable insights in mainly three fields. . . . First, it offers a careful and well-balanced description of what the Indian craze actually meant. . . . Second, the book is also a key contribution to a new understanding of modernism in Western art and culture. . . . Third, Indian Craze is also a major contribution to the issue of transcultural hybridization." -- Jan Baetens * Leonardo Reviews *
"While the experience of modernism in less urban western places was no doubt different, modernism still must have been present. Without the insights of Hutchinson's book, however, historians could not even begin to identify modernism in rural America at the turn of the twentieth century. In short, The Indian Craze is a potentially paradigm-shifting book, one that will force new discussions of who participates in the modern world and how."
-- Flannery Burke * Journal of American History *

You may also be interested in...

Experimental Beijing
Added to basket
The Work of Art in the World
Added to basket
Performance
Added to basket
£20.99
Paperback
Bloodflowers
Added to basket
£21.99
Paperback
The Queer Art of Failure
Added to basket
The One and the Many
Added to basket
Wet
Added to basket
Wet
£21.99
Paperback
Visual Time
Added to basket
£20.99
Paperback
How Art Can Be Thought
Added to basket
Art beyond Itself
Added to basket
Chinese Surplus
Added to basket
Allegories of the Anthropocene
Added to basket
Designs for the Pluriverse
Added to basket
Contemporary Chinese Art
Added to basket
On Chantal Akerman
Added to basket

Please sign in to write a review

Your review has been submitted successfully.