The Great Tamasha: Cricket, Corruption and the Turbulent Rise of Modern India - Wisden Sports Writing (Paperback)
  • The Great Tamasha: Cricket, Corruption and the Turbulent Rise of Modern India - Wisden Sports Writing (Paperback)
zoom

The Great Tamasha: Cricket, Corruption and the Turbulent Rise of Modern India - Wisden Sports Writing (Paperback)

(author)
1 Review Sign in to write a review
£9.99
Paperback 320 Pages / Published: 27/02/2014
  • In stock online

Usually despatched within 24 hours

  • This item has been added to your basket
Your local Waterstones may have stock of this item. Please check by using Click & Collect
On a Bangalore night in April 2008, cricket and India changed forever. It was the first night of the Indian Premier League - cricket, but not as we knew it. It involved big money, glitz, prancing girls and Bollywood stars. It was not so much sport as tamasha: a great entertainment. The Great Tamasha examines how a game and a country, both regarded as synonymous with infinite patience, managed to produce such an event. James Astill explains how India's economic surge and cricketing obsession made it the dominant power in world cricket, off the field if rarely on it. He tells how cricket has become the central focus of the world's second-biggest nation: the place where power and money and celebrity and corruption all meet, to the rapt attention of a billion eyeballs. Astill crosses the subcontinent and, over endless cups of tea, meets the people who make up modern India - from faded princes to back-street bookmakers, slum kids to squillionaires - and sees how cricket shapes their lives and that of their country. Finally, in London he meets Indian cricket's fallen star, Lalit Modi, whose driving energy helped build this new form of cricket before he was dismissed in disgrace: a story that says much about modern India. The Great Tamasha is a fascinating examination of the most important development in cricket today. A brilliant evocation of an endlessly beguiling country, it is also essential reading for anyone who wants to understand the workings of modern India. Winner of the British Sports Book Awards Cricket Book of the Year 2014.

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing PLC
ISBN: 9781408158777
Number of pages: 320
Weight: 256 g
Dimensions: 198 x 129 mm


MEDIA REVIEWS
Astill has written a fascinating book about cricket, which sent me scurrying to Wisden to check Tiger Pataudi's Test batting average ... But he has also written a serious book about India whose problems are illuminated through an extended treatment of the national sporting obsession * Philip Collins, The Times *
Ambitious and excellent ... Astill is a lean and elegant writer ... He is acute in observing how differently Indian and Pakistan fans relate to their cricketers ... above all, The Great Tamasha is a cricket-lover's book * Gideon Haigh, The Cricketer *
A clear-sighted and superbly researched study of cricket in India ... Politics in democratic India, Astill observes, is "feudal, corrupt and vindictive", and the administration of cricket is no more than an aspect of politics ... Astill seems to have talked to everyone who is anyone involved in this deeply unattractive business * Sunday Telegraph *
An enchanting as well as enchanted passage through an India that has turned what was once an English summer game into a multi-million dollar national entertainment ... Astill is a storyteller, and what sets The Great Tamasha apart from the usual cricket literature is the seamless blending of politics, sociology, economy and sports history in a narrative enriched by drama and delightful set pieces * S. Prasannarajan, India Today *
Engaging, perceptive and rigorous ... The Great Tamasha tells a fascinating story well. Anyone interested in India, or cricket, and most certainly both, will enjoy it very much * Jason Burke, Observer *
What makes Astill's book exceptional is his first-hand reporting ... We meet powerful Indian politicians from Sharad Power, who aspired to be prime minister and headed international cricket, to residents of Dharavi in Mumbai, one of the biggest slums in Asia * Mihir Bose, Independent *
The combination of reporter's notebook, sporting history and a descriptive style makes The Great Tamasha compelling reading * Financial Times *
[Astill] is a daring story-teller: the book changes course with the regularity of the Brahmaputra, turning between politics, culture, crime, economics, celebrity and sport ... Through his interviews and reportage, you get an impression of Indian society, its people and their concerns. * Spectator blog *
An entertaining and important new book * The Telegraph, Calcutta *
Astill tells expertly the story of the enthusiastic adoption of cricket in India * Stephen Fay, TLS *
An important and incisive new book * NPR *
The Great Tamasha is the perfect example of a book which can intrigue and delight as much as the latest thriller: the story of modern India told through one of its most lucrative displays of wealth, cricket's Indian Premier League * The National, Best Summer Reads *
One of the best books on cricket that I have read. Perhaps it should not be called a book on cricket, because it is not. But cricket is a prism through which Astill attempts to comment on the transformation that has occurred, and is occurring, in India ... Astill is a brilliant writer * Surjit Bhalla, Indian Express *
[Astill] writes with solicitude - relatively rare in recent books about "rising" India - for the also-rans, the perennially disadvantaged and the utterly hopeless ... One gifted cricketer he meets in a Mumbai slum is wary of the hard leather ball that "might injure his hands, which he used to make tiny stitches on silk saris" ... Astill brings a divertingly caustic energy to his encounters with the successful * Pankaj Mishra, Bloomberg *
A beautiful book * Daniel Hodges, Daily Telegraph *
Astill's device, using the game as a prism, is novel and enlightening * Asian Age *
This is an excellent book on India even if you, like I, have no real understanding of cricket * Tyler Cowen, Symposium Magazine *
Meticulous yet poetic * Wall Street Journal Blog *
Astill sets out to examine the complexities of modern India through the game of cricket ... His energetic reporting and a fluent grasp of history make for a compelling rendering of a cricket-mad country * New Yorker *

You may also be interested in...

Endeavour
Added to basket
£20.00   £15.00
Hardback
The Hungry Empire
Added to basket
Arnhem
Added to basket
£25.00   £20.00
Hardback
Homo Deus
Added to basket
£9.99   £7.99
Paperback
Women & Power
Added to basket
£7.99
Hardback
Watling Street
Added to basket
£9.99   £7.99
Paperback
Bread for All
Added to basket
£9.99
Paperback
The Square and the Tower
Added to basket
£10.99   £8.99
Paperback
Good Night Stories for Rebel Girls
Added to basket
The Descent of Man
Added to basket
Jane Austen at Home
Added to basket
£9.99   £7.99
Paperback
The Earth is Weeping
Added to basket
£10.99   £8.99
Paperback
The Time Traveller's Guide to Restoration Britain
Added to basket
Why I'm No Longer Talking to White People About Race
Added to basket
Good Night Stories For Rebel Girls 2
Added to basket
Long Road from Jarrow
Added to basket
£8.99   £7.99
Paperback

Reviews

View all

“A book for all cricket lovers”

James Astill’s The Great Tamasha is a real tour de force. A tamasha is a Hindi word meaning an entertainment, a performance or a show; and the book is about what Astill calls the conquest of India by the tamasha that... More

Hardback edition
22nd November 2013
Helpful? Upvote 8

Please sign in to write a review

Your review has been submitted successfully.