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The End of Art (Paperback)
  • The End of Art (Paperback)
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The End of Art (Paperback)

(author)
£20.99
Paperback 226 Pages / Published: 07/02/2005
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In The End of Art, Donald Kuspit argues that art is over because it has lost its aesthetic import. Art has been replaced by 'postart', a term invented by Alan Kaprow, as a new visual category that elevates the banal over the enigmatic, the scatological over the sacred, cleverness over creativity. Tracing the demise of aesthetic experience to the works and theory of Marcel Duchamp and Barnett Newman, Kuspit argues that devaluation is inseparable from the entropic character of modern art, and that anti-aesthetic postmodern art is its final state. In contrast to modern art, which expressed the universal human unconscious, postmodern art degenerates into an expression of narrow ideological interests. In reaction to the emptiness and stagnancy of postart, Kuspit signals the aesthetic and human future that lies with the New Old Masters. The End of Art points the way to the future for the visual arts.

Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9780521540162
Number of pages: 226
Weight: 320 g
Dimensions: 228 x 152 x 15 mm


MEDIA REVIEWS
"This is an excellent book for understanding the post-modern art scene and how the next generation of visual artists might proceed." -Tampa Tribune
"Kuspit's view is persuasive...The End of Art didn't make my mind up for me; rather, it opened up room for debate with artist friends and fellow gallery hoppers about the definition of art, whether it can be judged according to a universal standard and where it's going. It made me more aware of my powers of perception and my power as a perceiver, and encouraged me to seek out art that pleases me, for whatever reason." -The Nation

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