The Economic Utilisation of Food Co-Products - Green Chemistry Series (Hardback)
  • The Economic Utilisation of Food Co-Products - Green Chemistry Series (Hardback)
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The Economic Utilisation of Food Co-Products - Green Chemistry Series (Hardback)

(editor), (editor)
£139.99
Hardback 246 Pages / Published: 09/10/2013
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As the world's population continues to grow so does the demand for food, and in consequence the amount of material left over from food production. No longer considered simply as "waste", many food co-products are being identified as economically-viable raw materials and their potential is enhanced by modern processing technologies and the biorefinery concept. This book presents a general overview of the current situation, with perspectives from within the food industry and policy makers in the introductory chapters. These are followed by five chapters exploring modern advanced processing techniques. Further chapters are dedicated to separate food groups, including cereals, oils, rice and fish, exploring the potential for making the best use of the co-products generated. Many of the processing technologies discussed will be familiar to students and practitioners of green chemistry, but the book goes further in presenting examples and case studies, written by active workers in the field from across the globe. Food technicians and process engineers will be amongst the researchers in academia and industry and postgraduate students this book is aimed for.

Publisher: Royal Society of Chemistry
ISBN: 9781849736152
Number of pages: 246
Weight: 513 g
Dimensions: 234 x 156 x 18 mm


MEDIA REVIEWS
This book is Part 24. within the series of "RSC Green Chemistry" (ISBN 978-1-84973-615-2). The food supply is very critical to human society. It is a problem that due to the gradual depletion of the petrochemical feed stocks, a part of the primary source of foods is directed to the biofuel program. It is obvious that the food in general is being valorised these days. As a consequence, the topic of food waste is also an important problem. On the one hand, the 30% waste of the food produced in Europe should be utilized. The book under discussion deals with the second item. The first chapter is on "Green chemistry and the biorefinery" discussing the sustainable processing of biomass into different marketable products and energy. Extractable high-value chemicals in food and by-products, as well as the transformation of glycerol into valuable products are discussed. The second chapter gives an overview on the food waste policy of the European Union. A major principle is the hierarchy: to reduce - reuse - recycle - recover - dispose.. Chapter 3 is on the conversion of biomass into high value products by microwave pyrolysis. The diverse spectrum of pyrolizable biomass may include cellulose/wood, coffee hulls, pine, corn stover, aspen and rice straw. Chapter 4 discusses the conversion of food waste into products/intermediates for the chemical industry, and for use in materials science or agriculture. In principle, urban waste treatment plants should become biorefineries for the production of chemicals and energy. Chapter 5 is devoted to the utilization of waste starch in the paper and textile industry and as a component in plastic composites. Chapter 6 shows the possibilities for the utilization of cooking oil and recovered triglycerides. The conversion of cooking oil to biofuels and the valorisation of glycerol are important issues. Chapter 7 introduces us to the conversion of rapeseed meal and sunflower "cake" into biodegradable materials. The target readership includes practitioners of green chemistry, process engineers, food chemists and technicians both in academia and industry. A considerable part of the book may form the basis of MSc and PhD courses. -- Gyoergy Keglevich * Current Green Chemistry *
The target readership includes practitioners of green chemistry, process engineers, food chemists and technicians both in academia and industry. A considerable part of the book may form the basis of MSc and PhD courses. -- Gyoergy Keglevich * Current Green Chemistry *
Living now, in the 21st century, it is surprising that 815 million people are undernourished and still 1600 children die every day from hunger-related causes, while in Europe alone more than 30% of the food produced is wasted. This book elaborates on the recycling of industrial food waste as an alternative carbon source. All chapters are written by specialists in the regarding field. Chapter 1 gives an introduction about green chemistry and bio-refinery. It starts with the definition of a bio-refinery and distinguishes clearly between biomass processing plants and bio-refineries. Furthermore it gives an overview which chemicals can be extracted from which food sources and its applications. It also describes the most promising green processes on transforming glycerol into high-quality products and by-products, like biodiesel. Chapter 2, Food waste in the European Union, mostly gives facts and statistics about the current food waste in Europe, seen from different points of view, like country, sector or food group. In addition it compares the vision of the EU on the future with the situation now. Chapter 3 starts with a comparison about biochemical and thermochemical breakdown of biomass into biofuel, via pyrolysis. After this they divide thermochemical pyrolysis, with regard to the heating source, into conventional and microwave pyrolysis. They elaborate about microwaves, briefly touch plasma chemistry and finish with some recent research development examples. In chapter 4 the authors describe the food waste conversion into products for the chemical industry, for instance soluble bio-based products (SBO) as biocatalysts or for waste-water treatment. Chapter 5 is dedicated to (waste) starch. It describes what it is, what it can be used for and from which sources it can be obtained. Chapter 6 focusses on used cooking oil (UCO); its lifecycle, properties, use and re-use. It also looks into the main by-product obtained from oil refinery, glycerol and its applications. In the final chapter, the industrial use of oil-cakes is described. The properties of oilseed proteins are depicted, some processing techniques discussed and the properties of these protein-based materials reviewed. Most of the chapters are written clearly and with passion though the intended audience seems to vary. Yet, some chapters are quite specific about chemistry and physics while others purely state known facts. Most of the illustrations are clear and add value to the story, although some pictures look unprofessional due to poor quality. It is a bit surprising, however, that the book opens with statements about the unfair division of food in the world, but only focusses on the transformation of food waste in Europe into biofuels and chemicals. Even within this focus, it would have been beneficial if the book would have been given more consistent with its views. This would have resulted in a more harmonious tale. However this is a well-known shortcoming of many edited books compiling views of many different authors. In this sense an overall view or conclusion from the editors would have made a fine epilogue. On the other hand, an advantage of is that every chapter starts with quite an elaborate introduction, combining many useful knowledge. The book gives an elaborate overview of the work done in this field and a lot of references are summarized. Besides explaining many commonly used techniques and processes it also presents examples where these are applied for green chemistry. This book is particularly a good start for students or professionals who just started in this field and want to learn a variety of topics to get a good perspective. -- Laura Kollau * Green Process Synth DOI 10.1515/gps-2014-0006 ; 3: 185 *
Most of the chapters are written clearly and with passion An advantage of is that every chapter starts with quite an elaborate introduction, combining many useful knowledge. This book is particularly a good start for students or professionals who just started in this field and want to learn a variety of topics to get a good perspective. -- Laura Kollau * DOI 10.1515/gps-2014-0006 Green Process Synth 2014; 3: 185 *

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