• Sign In / Register
  • Help
  • Basket0
The Early American Press, 1690-1783 (Hardback)
  • The Early American Press, 1690-1783 (Hardback)
zoom

The Early American Press, 1690-1783 (Hardback)

(author), (author)
£67.00
Hardback 248 Pages / Published: 30/09/1994
  • We can order this

Usually despatched within 3 weeks

  • This item has been added to your basket
The first book in a six-volume series on the history of American journalism, this volume provides a survey of the earliest printing in the American colonies, up through the Revolutionary War. The work focuses on the nature of journalism during the years covered, considers noteworthy figures, examines the relationship of journalism to society, and provides explanations for the main directions that journalism was taking. Early American printing was animated by remarkable vitality and sophistication, with the life of each newspaper and printer being marked by individual ideas and individual struggles. Early Americans also had quite sophisticated ideas about the role and operation of the press. In this survey, the authors try to suggest the complexities of the early American press. They address such issues as why newspapers first appeared, the purpose that newspaper operators saw for themselves, the role of the practice of journalism in the colonial press, and the role of the press in influencing public opinion. Their primary focus, however, is on the essential nature of the early American press and the factors that accounted for that character.

Publisher: ABC-CLIO
ISBN: 9780313275258
Number of pages: 248
Weight: 562 g
Dimensions: 235 x 155 x 22 mm


MEDIA REVIEWS
..."one of the books greatest strengths is that the early American press is taken seriously, and so the origins of American journalism are closely, astutely, and comprehensively examined and analyzed. Sloan and Williams clearly have made an extremely important contribution to the historical scholarship of this period by demonstrating the high degree of press sophistication that previously has been ignored or disregarded by writers uninterested in the social and intellectual content of early American periodicals. The extensive endnotes, bibliography, and solid historigraphical foundation qualify it as required reading for a graduate course in American journalism history. Furthermore, the high quality of this book holds much promise for a welcomed series of great import to the discipline."-Journalism Educator
..."a valuable addition to the study of journalism's past."-Journalism & Mass Communications Quarterly
"This excellent book describes the American press's first 93 years within the cultural context of the era. The authors reveal a mosaic of influences and discuss the parallel between the press in the American colonies and Great Britain after about 1750. The book is the first volume in what looks to be a promising new series on the American press. Very highly recommended for all journalism and American history collections, upper-division undergraduate and above."-Choice
"By creating a work that is based upon investigation of primary sources, The Early American Press can authoritatively challenge, for example, concepts of journalistic motivation and press influence. The book offers its readers an extensive bibliography and a bibliographic essay that approaches the study of the press of early America from various historic schools. An important step for media history. Through close reevaluation of the press of the eighteenth century, Sloan and Williams are pointing out that there is a complexity in early American printing that belies assumptions of simple four-page, boring sheets of news."-Journalism History
?...a valuable addition to the study of journalism's past.?-Journalism & Mass Communications Quarterly
?This excellent book describes the American press's first 93 years within the cultural context of the era. The authors reveal a mosaic of influences and discuss the parallel between the press in the American colonies and Great Britain after about 1750. The book is the first volume in what looks to be a promising new series on the American press. Very highly recommended for all journalism and American history collections, upper-division undergraduate and above.?-Choice
?By creating a work that is based upon investigation of primary sources, The Early American Press can authoritatively challenge, for example, concepts of journalistic motivation and press influence. The book offers its readers an extensive bibliography and a bibliographic essay that approaches the study of the press of early America from various historic schools. An important step for media history. Through close reevaluation of the press of the eighteenth century, Sloan and Williams are pointing out that there is a complexity in early American printing that belies assumptions of simple four-page, boring sheets of news.?-Journalism History
?...one of the books greatest strengths is that the early American press is taken seriously, and so the origins of American journalism are closely, astutely, and comprehensively examined and analyzed. Sloan and Williams clearly have made an extremely important contribution to the historical scholarship of this period by demonstrating the high degree of press sophistication that previously has been ignored or disregarded by writers uninterested in the social and intellectual content of early American periodicals. The extensive endnotes, bibliography, and solid historigraphical foundation qualify it as required reading for a graduate course in American journalism history. Furthermore, the high quality of this book holds much promise for a welcomed series of great import to the discipline.?-Journalism Educator
.,."a valuable addition to the study of journalism's past."-Journalism & Mass Communications Quarterly
.,."one of the books greatest strengths is that the early American press is taken seriously, and so the origins of American journalism are closely, astutely, and comprehensively examined and analyzed. Sloan and Williams clearly have made an extremely important contribution to the historical scholarship of this period by demonstrating the high degree of press sophistication that previously has been ignored or disregarded by writers uninterested in the social and intellectual content of early American periodicals. The extensive endnotes, bibliography, and solid historigraphical foundation qualify it as required reading for a graduate course in American journalism history. Furthermore, the high quality of this book holds much promise for a welcomed series of great import to the discipline."-Journalism Educator

You may also be interested in...

Martha Gellhorn
Added to basket
Blood and Sand
Added to basket
£9.99
Paperback
North Korea Undercover
Added to basket
Heroes
Added to basket
£12.99
Paperback
Flat Earth News
Added to basket
£9.99
Paperback
Unreasonable Behaviour
Added to basket
Photography: A Very Short Introduction
Added to basket
Soccer War
Added to basket
£8.99
Paperback
The News Machine
Added to basket
£12.99
Paperback
Facts are Sacred
Added to basket
£20.00
Hardback
Rock Stars Stole my Life!
Added to basket
Can I Carry Your Bags?
Added to basket
Can Journalism Survive?
Added to basket
Waugh in Abyssinia
Added to basket
£12.99
Paperback
Commando
Added to basket
£12.99
Paperback

Reviews

Please sign in to write a review

Your review has been submitted successfully.