The Contest over National Security: FDR, Conservatives, and the Struggle to Claim the Most Powerful Phrase in American Politics (Hardback)
  • The Contest over National Security: FDR, Conservatives, and the Struggle to Claim the Most Powerful Phrase in American Politics (Hardback)
zoom

The Contest over National Security: FDR, Conservatives, and the Struggle to Claim the Most Powerful Phrase in American Politics (Hardback)

(author)
£37.95
Hardback 320 Pages
Published: 19/03/2024
  • 5+ in stock
  • Free UK delivery

Usually dispatched within 2-3 working days

  • This item has been added to your basket

A new history shows how FDR developed a vision of national security focused not just on protecting Americans against physical attack but also on ensuring their economic well-being—and how the nascent conservative movement won the battle to narrow its meaning, durably reshaping US politics.

Americans take for granted that national security comprises physical defense against attacks. But the concept of national security once meant something more. Franklin Roosevelt’s vision for national security, Peter Roady argues, promised an alternate path for the United States by devoting as much attention to economic want as to foreign threats. The Contest over National Security shows how a burgeoning conservative movement and power-hungry foreign policy establishment together defeated FDR’s plans for a comprehensive national security state and inaugurated the narrower approach to national security that has dominated ever since.

In the 1930s, Roosevelt and his advisors, hoping to save the United States from fascism and communism, argued that national security entailed protection from both physical attack and economic want. Roosevelt’s opponents responded by promoting a more limited national security state privileging military defense over domestic economic policy. Conservatives brought numerous concerns to bear through an enormous public relations offensive, asserting not just that Roosevelt’s plans threatened individual freedom but also that the government was less competent than the private sector and incapable of delivering economic security.

This contest to define the government’s national security responsibilities in law and in the public mind, Roady reveals, explains why the United States developed separate and imbalanced national security and welfare states, with far-reaching consequences. By recovering FDR’s forgotten vision, Roady restores a more expansive understanding of national security’s meanings as Americans today face the great challenges of their times.

Publisher: Harvard University Press
ISBN: 9780674291256
Number of pages: 320
Weight: 612 g
Dimensions: 235 x 156 x 25 mm


MEDIA REVIEWS

A compelling demonstration of the power of words and persuasion. Roady’s account of the post–New Deal eclipse of ‘security’ as a domestic policy imperative is a must-read for anyone interested in the past and future of the national security state. - Daniel T. Rodgers, author of Contested Truths: Keywords in American Politics since Independence

Peter Roady’s insightful, capacious book offers us new ways of thinking about the history of the concept of national security. By showing us an era when the idea of security was politically contested, he asks us what it might truly mean to live in a safer and freer world. - Kim Phillips-Fein, author of Fear City: New York’s Fiscal Crisis and the Rise of Austerity Politics

National security ranks among the most potent ideas in American politics. Peter Roady gives us a revelatory account of the concept’s origins and evolution. The Contest over National Security ought to be required reading for anyone interested—or involved—in the work of government. - Daniel J. Sargent, author of A Superpower Transformed: The Remaking of American Foreign Relations in the 1970s

In this carefully researched, crisply written new history of the 1930s and 1940s, Peter Roady explains how definitions of US national security, which President Franklin D. Roosevelt initially described in sweeping terms, became artificially constrained. In doing so, Roady paves the way for improved conversations about the true meanings of national and global security in today’s precarious world. - Mark R. Wilson, author of Destructive Creation: American Business and the Winning of World War II

The concept and language of national security have considerable power in US history and current politics, but their meaning is not fixed. As scholars and citizens alike, we should have a clearer sense of what it has meant and could mean for the people of the United States to enjoy greater security. Weighing in on a number of vital debates, The Contest over National Security is diligently researched and persuasively argued—an excellent book that will be important not only to historians but to the larger world of serious readers. - Eric Rauchway, author of Why the New Deal Matters

You may also be interested in...

D-Day
Added to basket
£12.99
Paperback
The 33 Strategies Of War
Added to basket
The Forgotten Highlander
Added to basket
Empire of the Deep
Added to basket
£16.99
Paperback
Fortress Malta
Added to basket
£10.99
Paperback
Dunkirk
Added to basket
£14.99
Paperback
Armageddon
Added to basket
£18.99
Paperback
The Battle of Britain
Added to basket
The Guns of August
Added to basket
The Concise 33 Strategies of War
Added to basket
Love and War in the Apennines
Added to basket
Return of a King
Added to basket
The Longest Afternoon
Added to basket
The Men Who Stare At Goats
Added to basket
HMS Belfast Guidebook
Added to basket
Vulcan 607
Added to basket
£10.99
Paperback

Please sign in to write a review

Your review has been submitted successfully.

env: aptum
branch: