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The Case Against the Davis-Bacon Act: Fifty-Four Reasons for Repeal (Paperback)
  • The Case Against the Davis-Bacon Act: Fifty-Four Reasons for Repeal (Paperback)
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The Case Against the Davis-Bacon Act: Fifty-Four Reasons for Repeal (Paperback)

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£40.99
Paperback 292 Pages / Published: 15/02/2013
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The Davis-Bacon Act is a United States federal law that established the requirement that prevailing wages must be paid on public works projects. In this book, Armand J. Thieblot argues that the law was passed under false pretenses and based on flawed economic logic. Despite this, the law continues to expand in scope and increase in cost. The act is supported by a substantial bureaucracy within the Department of Labor that has resisted all efforts at substantive modernization or reform. Today, the Davis-Bacon Act is the bedrock upon which stands one of the last bastions of private unionization in the construction industry. This book provides a compelling list of fifty-four separate reasons why the Davis-Bacon Act should be repealed.

Thieblot deals with the history, purposes, and administrative concepts of prevailing wage laws, providing an overview of the act's administration. He covers the survey and determination process, and delves into how the act is administered. Thieblot summarizes its direct and indirect costs, evaluates counterclaims on the economic impact of Davis-Bacon, and considers compromises short of full repeal. Also included are seven appendices that provide full support for the conclusions summarized in the main text.

Thieblot documents a case against Davis-Bacon that is neither judgmental nor political, but he does question whether there is compelling public interest in maintaining a federal prevailing wage law. He puts forward a list of reasons why the Davis-Bacon Act should be repealed, making a convincing case that deserves action and not just simple consideration. This work should be read by all economists, lawmakers, and government officials.

Publisher: Taylor & Francis Inc
ISBN: 9781412849883
Number of pages: 292
Weight: 408 g
Dimensions: 229 x 152 x 15 mm


MEDIA REVIEWS

"Thieblot. . . argues that the Davis-Bacon Act, first passed in 1931, is now obsolete, and that the use of prevailing wage laws in the construction industry is a waste of money. Familiarity with labor relations terms and concepts is assumed, but no knowledge of complex mathematics or economic modeling is required. The book first deals with the history, purposes, and administrative concepts of prevailing wage laws, and provides an overview of the Davis-Bacon Act's administration. It then goes into greater detail about administration of the act, especially with respect to the prevailingness of job titles or characterization of work, the presumptive singularity of union wage rates by craft and class, and the creation and extension of determination rates. The final chapter summarizes the direct and indirect costs of the act, evaluates counterclaims on the economic impact of Davis-Bacon, and considers compromises short of full repeal."

--Book News


"Thieblot. . . argues that the Davis-Bacon Act, first passed in 1931, is now obsolete, and that the use of prevailing wage laws in the construction industry is a waste of money. Familiarity with labor relations terms and concepts is assumed, but no knowledge of complex mathematics or economic modeling is required. The book first deals with the history, purposes, and administrative concepts of prevailing wage laws, and provides an overview of the Davis-Bacon Act's administration. It then goes into greater detail about administration of the act, especially with respect to the prevailingness of job titles or characterization of work, the presumptive singularity of union wage rates by craft and class, and the creation and extension of determination rates. The final chapter summarizes the direct and indirect costs of the act, evaluates counterclaims on the economic impact of Davis-Bacon, and considers compromises short of full repeal."

--Book News


-Thieblot. . . argues that the Davis-Bacon Act, first passed in 1931, is now obsolete, and that the use of prevailing wage laws in the construction industry is a waste of money. Familiarity with labor relations terms and concepts is assumed, but no knowledge of complex mathematics or economic modeling is required. The book first deals with the history, purposes, and administrative concepts of prevailing wage laws, and provides an overview of the Davis-Bacon Act's administration. It then goes into greater detail about administration of the act, especially with respect to the prevailingness of job titles or characterization of work, the presumptive singularity of union wage rates by craft and class, and the creation and extension of determination rates. The final chapter summarizes the direct and indirect costs of the act, evaluates counterclaims on the economic impact of Davis-Bacon, and considers compromises short of full repeal.-

--Book News

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