The Accommodated Animal: Cosmopolity in Shakespearean Locales (Hardback)
  • The Accommodated Animal: Cosmopolity in Shakespearean Locales (Hardback)
zoom

The Accommodated Animal: Cosmopolity in Shakespearean Locales (Hardback)

(author)
£67.50
Hardback 304 Pages / Published: 04/01/2013
  • We can order this

Usually dispatched within 3 weeks

  • This item has been added to your basket
Shakespeare wrote of lions, shrews, horned toads, curs, mastiffs, and hell-hounds. But he used the word "animal" only eight times in his work - which was typical for the sixteenth century, when the word was rarely used. As Laurie Shannon reveals in "The Accommodated Animal", the animal-human divide first came strongly into play in the seventeenth century, with Descartes' famous formulation that reason sets humans above other species: "I think, therefore I am." Before that moment, animals could claim a firmer place alongside humans in a larger vision of belonging, or what Shannon terms cosmopolity. With Shakespeare as her touch-stone, Shannon explores the creaturely dispensation that existed until Descartes. She finds that early modern writers used classical natural history and readings of "Genesis" to credit animals with various kinds of stakeholdership, prerogative, and entitlement, employing the language of politics in a constitutional vision of cosmic membership. Using this political idiom to frame cross-species relations, Shannon argues, carried with it the notion that animals possess their own investments in the world, a point distinct from the question of whether animals have reason. It also enabled a sharp critique of the tyranny of humankind. By answering "the question of the animal" historically, "The Accommodated Animal" makes a brilliant contribution to cross-disciplinary debates engaging political theory, intellectual history, and literary studies.

Publisher: The University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 9780226924168
Number of pages: 304
Weight: 476 g
Dimensions: 229 x 152 x 25 mm


MEDIA REVIEWS
"This big, beautiful, growling, howling book is as revelatory about language as it is about the natural history of our animal kinships: the 'curtailed' dog, the 'sovereignties' of motion, and the 'race' of locomotive animals invite us to encounter familiar words on all fours, our phantom tails and impotent noses newly alert to semantic climate changes."
--Julia Reinhard Lupton "Studies in English Literature 1500 1900 ""
This big, beautiful, growling, howling book is as revelatory about language as it is about the natural history of our animal kinships: the curtailed dog, the sovereignties of motion, and the race of locomotive animals invite us to encounter familiar words on all fours, our phantom tails and impotent noses newly alert to semantic climate changes.
--Julia Reinhard Lupton "Studies in English Literature 1500 1900 ""

You may also be interested in...

Shakespeare's Restless World
Added to basket
"Twelfth Night"
Added to basket
Macbeth: York Notes for AS & A2
Added to basket
The Merchant Of Venice
Added to basket
Romeo and Juliet
Added to basket
Heinemann Advanced Shakespeare: King Lear
Added to basket
The Shakespeare Book
Added to basket
DK
£17.99
Hardback
Romeo and Juliet (No Fear Shakespeare)
Added to basket
Henry V: The Oxford Shakespeare
Added to basket
Othello: The Oxford Shakespeare
Added to basket
"The Taming of the Shrew"
Added to basket
Twelfth Night
Added to basket
£7.99
Paperback

Reviews

Please sign in to write a review

Your review has been submitted successfully.