Talking to Our Selves: Reflection, Ignorance, and Agency (Paperback)
  • Talking to Our Selves: Reflection, Ignorance, and Agency (Paperback)
zoom

Talking to Our Selves: Reflection, Ignorance, and Agency (Paperback)

(author)
£18.99
Paperback 278 Pages / Published: 01/06/2017
  • We can order this

Usually dispatched within 1 week

  • This item has been added to your basket
John M. Doris presents a new account of agency and responsibility, which reconciles our understanding of ourselves as moral agents with psychological research on the unconscious mind. Much philosophical theorizing maintains that the exercise of morally responsible agency consists in judgment and behavior ordered by accurate reflection. On such theories, when human beings are able to direct their lives in the manner philosophers have dignified with the honorific 'agency', it's because they know what they're doing, and why they're doing it. This understanding is compromised by quantities of psychological research on unconscious processing, which suggests that accurate reflection is distressingly uncommon; very often behavior is ordered by surprisingly inaccurate self-awareness. Thus, if agency requires accurate reflection, people seldom exercise agency, and skepticism about agency threatens. To counter the skeptical threat, John M. Doris proposes an alternative theory that requires neither reflection nor accurate self-awareness: he identifies a dialogic form of agency where self-direction is facilitated by exchange of the rationalizations with which people explain and justify themselves to one another. The result is a stoutly interdisciplinary theory sensitive to both what human beings are like-creatures with opaque and unruly psychologies-and what they need: an account of agency sufficient to support a practice of moral responsibility.

Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 9780198805182
Number of pages: 278
Weight: 428 g
Dimensions: 235 x 155 x 16 mm


MEDIA REVIEWS
Talking to Our Selves should appeal to all kinds of readers, philosophers and psychologists, students and the general public. For those who are aware of the current state of affairs, Doris is careful to situate his views with respect to other researchers and positions. It's an excellent model for those pursuing work at the intersection of philosophy and social science. But even for those who have not been following contemporary philosophy in this area, by focusing on the bigger picture, Doris has written an accessible and engaging book and one which gives the reader a sense of where empirical philosophy is headed. * Emily Esch, Metapsychology Online Reviews *

You may also be interested in...

Why We Sleep
Added to basket
£9.99   £7.99
Paperback
When the Dogs Don't Bark
Added to basket
£20.00   £16.99
Hardback
The Farm
Added to basket
£12.99   £10.99
Hardback
Lost Connections
Added to basket
£8.99   £6.99
Paperback
How to Be Human
Added to basket
£8.99   £6.99
Paperback
Battle Scars
Added to basket
£20.00   £15.99
Hardback
Clear Bright Future
Added to basket
£20.00   £15.99
Hardback
The Descent of Man
Added to basket
Saltwater
Added to basket
£16.99   £12.99
Hardback
The Silent Guides
Added to basket
£12.99   £9.99
Paperback
The Idiot Brain
Added to basket
£8.99
Paperback
My Hidden Chimp
Added to basket
£12.99   £9.99
Paperback
The Happy Brain
Added to basket
£8.99
Paperback
Love for Imperfect Things
Added to basket
£9.99   £8.99
Hardback
Behave
Added to basket
£10.99
Paperback
Have You Eaten Grandma?
Added to basket

Please sign in to write a review

Your review has been submitted successfully.