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Talking Appalachian: Voice, Identity, and Community (Hardback)
  • Talking Appalachian: Voice, Identity, and Community (Hardback)
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Talking Appalachian: Voice, Identity, and Community (Hardback)

(editor), (editor)
£62.50
Hardback 256 Pages / Published: 12/03/2013
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Tradition, community, and pride are fundamental aspects of the history of Appalachia, and the language of the region is a living testament to its rich heritage. Despite the persistence of unflattering stereotypes and cultural discrimination associated with their style of speech, Appalachians have organised to preserve regional dialects -- complex forms of English peppered with words, phrases, and pronunciations unique to the area and its people. Talking Appalachian examines these distinctive speech varieties and emphasises their role in expressing local history and promoting a shared identity.

Beginning with a historical and geographical overview of the region that analyses the origins of its dialects, this volume features detailed research and local case studies investigating their use. The contributors explore a variety of subjects, including the success of African American Appalachian English and southern Appalachian English speakers in professional and corporate positions. In addition, editors Amy D. Clark and Nancy M. Hayward provide excerpts from essays, poetry, short fiction, and novels to illustrate usage. With contributions from well-known authors such as George Ella Lyon and Silas House, this balanced collection is the most comprehensive, accessible study of Appalachian language available today.

Publisher: The University Press of Kentucky
ISBN: 9780813140964
Number of pages: 256
Weight: 576 g
Dimensions: 229 x 152 x 19 mm


MEDIA REVIEWS

"Winner of the Appalachian Writers' Association Book of the Year for Poetry" --


"This book fills a need in college and secondary classrooms in a unique and exciting way -- examining a stigmatized, regional variety that also serves as a strong indicator of in-group membership and identity for many (but not all) of its speakers through the use of both research studies and essays/literary excerpts. This is an ambitious project that will serve students, researchers, and instructors for many years to come." -- Jim Michnowicz, North Carolina State University


"Clark and Hayward are to be praised for assembling a well-ordered broad spectrum of conversant essays and literary pieces that stand to bring the study, understanding, and appreciation of Appalachian English(es) into a new era of cultivation." -- Chris Green, Director, Loyal Jones Appalachian Center, Berea College


" Talking Appalachian is a wonderful collection, challenging readers to learn about the many histories that have shaped Appalachian dialectical diversity and to gain tools to counter the linguistic chauvinism that has used Appalachian dialect as a stand-in for other powerful forms of social and economic marginalization, akin to the ways speakers of Gullah and other regional dialects have been marginalized in the U.S.. The excellent use of leading linguistic scholarship, essays, fiction and poetry in this volume makes it a powerful contribution." -- Ann Kingsolver, director of the Appalachian Center at the University of Kentucky


"A sense of pride, a strong grip on old traditions, and a unique style of commonality are part of both the marvel and mystery of Appalachia. Talking Appalachia: Voice, Identity, and Community (University Press of Kentucky), edited by Amy D. Clark and Nancy M. Hayward, complies scholarly writing about this area from contributors in a variety of professional disciplines as well as Appalachian writers, including Silas House, Jane Hicks, George Ella Lyon, Ron Rash, and Lee Smith." -- Ina Hughs, Knoxville News Sentinel


"This unique book creates an understanding and acceptance of the Appalachian vernacular as an expression of history, identity, and space. Includes bibliographies, index, and short biographies of the contributors." -- Claudene Sproles, Kentucky Libraries


"Beginning with a historical and geographical overview of the region that analyzes the origins of its dialects, this volume features detailed research and local case studies investigating their use.... With contributions from well-known authors such as George Ella Lyon and Silas House, this balanced collection is the most comprehensive accessible study of Appalachian language available today." -- Paintsville Herald


"An intimate view of regional American language and literature." -- Choice


"One part qualitative research, another part fiction, Talking Appalachian: Voice, Identity, and Community is an important contribution to ongoing conversations about the Appalachian region.

[... ] [T]hey add fresh insight to and reiterate or refute some of the old arguments about teaching vernacular-speaking students." -- West Virginia History


"[...] [The book] rounds out a reader's understanding of an important and identifiable characteristic of Appalachian life." -- Courier-Journal

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