Seeing Black and White - Oxford Psychology Series (Hardback)
  • Seeing Black and White - Oxford Psychology Series (Hardback)
zoom

Seeing Black and White - Oxford Psychology Series (Hardback)

(author)
£73.00
Hardback 448 Pages / Published: 31/08/2006
  • We can order this

Usually dispatched within 3 weeks

  • This item has been added to your basket
Most people are surprised to learn that seeing has not yet been explained by science. Incredibly, scientists cannot even explain why some surfaces appear to be black while others appear to be white. The physical difference between a surface that appears to be black and one that appears to be white results from the percentage ot light that the object reflects, known as reflectance. A white surface reflects 30 times more light into the eye than a black surface. The amount of light reflected by a surface into the eye is, however, a product of more than its own reflectance; it is also a product of the intensity of illumination it receives. A sheet of white paper lying within a shadow can easily reflect the same absolute amount of light as a sheet of black paper lying outside the shadow. Thus, there is essentially no correlation between the amount of light reflected by a suface and its physical shade: a black paper in a bright light and a white paper in shadow reflect identical light to the eye. Still, the black paper appears to be black and the white paper appears to be white. How can it be? Somehow the visual system must use the surrounding context. But how? Good thinkers have struggled with this problem for over a thousand years, and the last 150 years have witnessed a sustained assault on the problem. In this volume, Alan Gilchrist, one of the leading researchers in achromatic perception, reviews the history of the scientific development of lightness theory from the nineteenth century until the present and outlines and critiques all the main theories of lightness, laying out the strengths and weaknesses of each. Based on thirty years of research, Gilchrist presents his own argument that previous models of lightness perception are too good because they fail to capture the errors and illusions present in human perception. These errors may contain crucial clues in the sense that the overall pattern of errors is the signature of the human visual system.

Publisher: Oxford University Press Inc
ISBN: 9780195187168
Number of pages: 448
Weight: 772 g
Dimensions: 241 x 162 x 25 mm


MEDIA REVIEWS
Gilchrist's command of his subject enables him to guide the reader through a rich history of research,...and to show how the errors we make can uncover the software of the brain, before neatly arriving at his anchoring theory of lightness perception. It is beautifully written and richly furnished with examples and illusions. * The Psychologist, *
...a brilliant synopsis of what is currently known about our perception of light. It does a wonderful job of incorporating basic science with clinical and theoretical applications. The way the principles are laid out will pique the interest of anyone interested in how we see and perceive light. The exposition is clear and the book will be beneficial to readers who are new to the area and a valuable resource for experts. * Doody's Notes *

You may also be interested in...

The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat
Added to basket
The Lonely City
Added to basket
£9.99
Paperback
The Science of Meditation
Added to basket
£9.99   £7.99
Paperback
Why Buddhism is True
Added to basket
Emotional Intelligence
Added to basket
£10.99   £8.99
Paperback
The Idiot Brain
Added to basket
£8.99
Paperback
Outliers
Added to basket
£9.99   £7.99
Paperback
Why We Sleep
Added to basket
£9.99   £7.99
Paperback
Talking with Female Serial Killers
Added to basket
Other Minds
Added to basket
£9.99   £7.99
Paperback
Thinking, Fast and Slow
Added to basket
£10.99   £8.99
Paperback
The Language of Kindness
Added to basket
Man's Search For Meaning
Added to basket
£7.99   £6.49
Paperback
The Descent of Man
Added to basket
The Organized Mind
Added to basket
£9.99   £7.99
Paperback

Reviews

Please sign in to write a review

Your review has been submitted successfully.