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Science, Money and Politics: Political Triumph and Ethical Erosion (Hardback)
  • Science, Money and Politics: Political Triumph and Ethical Erosion (Hardback)
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Science, Money and Politics: Political Triumph and Ethical Erosion (Hardback)

(author)
£42.00
Hardback 528 Pages / Published: 08/10/2001
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Each year, Congress appropriates billions of dollars for scientific research. Each year, scientists complain of insufficient funding and lobby (usually unsuccessfully) for more money. This book explores who recieves the money, and the tactics they use to get it. From the end of World War II to 2001, and from medical research to particle physics, Daniel S. Greenberg reveals the little-known but all-pervasive links among science, money, and politics in the United States. He draws on archival research and interviews with presidential science advisers, congressional and White House staffers, and elected officials. The book reveals: the exaggerated claims of disease cures; how politicians supportive of medical research are rewarded with buildings named for them at the National Institutes of Health; why Ronald Reagan's science advisers remained silent, even though they knew that false claims were being made for a scientific breakthrough in the Star Wars missile-defence programme; and how, even as research lagged in the expiring USSR, leading American scientists warned Congress of Soviet scientific superiority - and the need for increased US funding to counter it. This work aims to blow the whistle on the scientists, politicians, and government officials who sacrifice ethics - and science itself - for money.

Publisher: The University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 9780226306346
Number of pages: 528
Weight: 880 g
Dimensions: 235 x 160 x 35 mm
Edition: 2nd ed.


MEDIA REVIEWS
"Greenberg's book [is] the product of almost four decades of close observation of the Washington science scene by one of its most acute analysts and sharpest critics . . . Greenberg, a former news editor of "Science", for many years chronicled in his fortnightly newsletter, "Science and Government Report", the complex interaction between the scientific community and the political establishment. No one, therefore, is better placed to document how each has successfully managed to meet the needs of the other since the end of the Second World War. . . . Many scientists continue to believe that science's generous support from the federal government is based primarily on the innate value of its potential contribution to social well-being. Greenberg's analysis of such events may well cause them to reconsider their view of how decisions about science funding are taken in practice. . . . [A] unique and revealing perspective on the way that the science-funding process actually works in Washington. The picture it paints is not a flattering one. But -- unlike many of those he writes about --Greenberg is not out to make friends in high places."-- David Dickson, "Nature"

--David Dickson "Nature "
"[A] unique and indispensable guide to the nether regions of the federally funded research enterprise in the United States. . . . [C]ertainly part of Greenberg's cantankerous intent is to expose the all-too-human motives and behavior of a community that often rests its demands for public support on the claim of special privilege. But this is not the whole story that he wants to tell. He also believes that the scientific community's ongoing infatuation with money has led to a progressive withdrawal from important

political issues."--Daniel Sarewitz "Science "
Greenberg's book [is] the product of almost four decades of close observation of the Washington science scene by one of its most acute analysts and sharpest critics . . . Greenberg, a former news editor of "Science," for many years chronicled in his fortnightly newsletter, "Science and Government Report," the complex interaction between the scientific community and the political establishment. No one, therefore, is better placed to document how each has successfully managed to meet the needs of the other since the end of the Second World War. . . . Many scientists continue to believe that science's generous support from the federal government is based primarily on the innate value of its potential contribution to social well-being. Greenberg's analysis of such events may well cause them to reconsider their view of how decisions about science funding are taken in practice. . . . [A] unique and revealing perspective on the way that the science-funding process actually works in Washington. The picture it paints is not a flattering one. But unlike many of those he writes about Greenberg is not out to make friends in high places. David Dickson, "Nature"
--David Dickson "Nature ""
[A] unique and indispensable guide to the nether regions of the federally funded research enterprise in the United States. . . . [C]ertainly part of Greenberg's cantankerous intent is to expose the all-too-human motives and behavior of a community that often rests its demands for public support on the claim of special privilege. But this is not the whole story that he wants to tell. He also believes that the scientific community's ongoing infatuation with money has led to a progressive withdrawal from important
political issues. --Daniel Sarewitz "Science ""

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