Science at Oxford, 1914-1939: Transforming an Arts University (Hardback)
  • Science at Oxford, 1914-1939: Transforming an Arts University (Hardback)
zoom

Science at Oxford, 1914-1939: Transforming an Arts University (Hardback)

(author)
£187.50
Hardback 496 Pages / Published: 04/12/1997
  • We can order this

Usually dispatched within 3 weeks

  • This item has been added to your basket
Oxford University has not always possessed the high reputation in the sciences for which it is now renowned: it was not until the period between this centurys two world wars that science was firmly established in a university previously noted for its devotion to arts subjects. By 1939, despite only modest increases in the numbers of fellows or undergraduates in science, Oxford had developed an important new research identity. This transformation took place in the face of considerable opposition. The powers of the colleges, the poverty of the University relative to collegiate wealth, and the heightened individualism endemic in a polycratic university combined to produce academic conservatism which even in the early twenties, could argue that Oxford should cede science to Cambridge and concentrate on its more traditional strengths in the arts. Jack Morrell shows how the innovators in the sciences coped with these idiosyncrasies and mustered a variety of resources, including government departments, leading industrialists, philanthropic trusts, and individual benefactors, to overcome academic inertia and to promote their subjects. Those interested in the institutionalization of science will find this study particularly important: it is the first book in English to examine the development of all the sciences in a major university of the twentieth century.

Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 9780198206576
Number of pages: 496
Weight: 930 g
Dimensions: 242 x 165 x 32 mm


MEDIA REVIEWS
Jack Morrell's book charts the complex paths by which Oxford achieved its new status in science. Breaking new ground in exploring the development of all the sciences at this one institution over a quarter of a century, it stylishly and effectively addresses a serious gap in the literature on twentieth-century British science. * Jeff Hughes, BJHS, Vol 34 *
J.B.M. rarely fails to pass on a good anecdote or pungent description from his sources * Jeff Hughes, BJHS, Vol 34 *
Science at Oxford is a goldmine of information and a striking achievement. It will be indispensable for historians of twentieth-century British science and its institutions. * Jeff Hughes, BJHS, Vol 34 *
Science at Oxford is a goldmine of information and a striking achievement. It will be indispensable for historians of twentieth-century British science and its institutions. * Jeff Hughes, British Journal for the History of Science, vol 34, No 121, June 2001 *
Jack Morrell's book ... stylishly and effectively addresses a serious gap in the literature on twentieth-century British science ... the book offers a comprehensive and empirically luxuriant over-view of inter-war Oxford science ... In addition to its many scholarly virtues, the book had the distinction of being witty, entertaining and superbly readable. Morrell has an unerring eye for the telling historical detail, and offers both potted curricula vitae and insightful social and character vignettes of many of the key figures in the story. * Jeff Hughes, British Journal for the History of Science, vol 34, No 121, June 2001 *
impressively detailed study. The opening three chapters provide an account of the context within which Oxford science operated and are essential reading for anyone who lacks a detailed knowledge of Oxford's unique system of university governance ... of value to all historians interested in twentieth-century British science. It constitutes a major contribution to our knowledge and understanding ... While it is likely that for many readers this book will act primarily as an authoritative source of information on individuals and particular disciplines, the breadth of its coverage ensures that the more persistent reader will gain far more from its insights. * Sally M Horrocks, Social History of Medicine, Vol 12, no 3 1999 *
most readable history of science at Oxford University between 1914 and 1939. There are 927 footnotes, many of them with much biographical information. Noteworthy in a broader context is Morrell's fascinating chapter on refugee scientists ... Though crammed with dry facts, the interestingly written text makes persons and events come alive ... Dip into this intriguing history for a fact or two, and you may well find yourself scan-reading for an hour or more. * Rudolf Schmid, Taxon *
Jack Morrell has produced a meticulous and scholarly account of the events which led to the growth of scientific subjects between the wars in a university previously dominated by the arts and humanities ... an invaluable work of reference for the historian of the subject; it is also a fascinating study of 'Oxford behind the scenes'. * Dr John Sanders, Interdisciplinary Science Reviews *

You may also be interested in...

Watling Street
Added to basket
£9.99   £7.99
Paperback
The Secret Lives of Colour
Added to basket
£12.99   £9.99
Paperback
The Descent of Man
Added to basket
21 Lessons for the 21st Century
Added to basket
£18.99   £15.99
Hardback
Women & Power
Added to basket
£7.99
Hardback
The Square and the Tower
Added to basket
£10.99   £8.99
Paperback
The Age of Decadence
Added to basket
£12.99   £10.99
Paperback
Women & Power
Added to basket
£6.99
Paperback
The Phoney Victory
Added to basket
Homo Deus
Added to basket
£9.99   £7.99
Paperback
Stories for Boys Who Dare to be Different
Added to basket
Arnhem
Added to basket
£25.00   £20.00
Hardback
The Unwomanly Face of War
Added to basket
£9.99   £7.99
Paperback
Good Night Stories For Rebel Girls 2
Added to basket
The British in India
Added to basket
Endeavour
Added to basket
£20.00   £15.00
Hardback

Reviews

Please sign in to write a review

Your review has been submitted successfully.