Producing Power: Ethnicity, Gender, and Class in a Caribbean Workplace (Paperback)
  • Producing Power: Ethnicity, Gender, and Class in a Caribbean Workplace (Paperback)
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Producing Power: Ethnicity, Gender, and Class in a Caribbean Workplace (Paperback)

(author)
£31.00
Paperback 304 Pages / Published: 22/06/1995
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In a small, locally owned Trinidadian factory that produces household goods, 80 percent of the line workers are women, almost all black or East Indian. The supervisors are all men, either white or East Indian. Kevin Yelvington worked for a year in this factory to study how ethnicity and gender are integral elements of the class structure, a social and economic structure that permeates all relations between men and women in the factory. These primary divisions determine the way the production process is ordered and labor divided.Unlike women in other industries in "underdeveloped" parts of the world who are recruited by foreign firms, Caribbean women have always contributed to the local economy. Within this historical context, Yelvington outlines the development of the state, and addresses exploitation and domination in the labor process. Yelvington also documents the sexually charged interactions between workers and managers and explores how both use flirting and innuendo to their advantage. Weddings and other social events outside the factory provide insightful details about how the creation of social identities carries over to all aspects of the local culture.

Publisher: Temple University Press,U.S.
ISBN: 9781566392860
Number of pages: 304
Weight: 445 g
Dimensions: 230 x 153 x 17 mm


MEDIA REVIEWS

"With a lively interplay of theory and ethnography, Producing Power reaches the high watermark of Caribbean studies. Anthropologists and social scientists hungry for texts that contextualize ethnicity will find in Yelvington's work the keen insight and sensitivity necessary to document the ways ethnicity, gender, and class are defined and revised in relation to one another as they influence the production process."
-David Griffith, East Carolina University


"Producing Power is, overall, a welcome addition to studies focusing on the conditions of women's work in the Caribbean in particular, and in the developing world in general. It is, as well, an innovative contribution to the literature on the intersection, interaction, and dialectic reproduction of ethnicity, class, and gender under capitalist forms of production."
-Gender and Society

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