Philosophical Profiles in the Theory of Communication: With a Foreword by Richard J. Bernstein and an Afterword by John Durham Peters (Hardback)
  • Philosophical Profiles in the Theory of Communication: With a Foreword by Richard J. Bernstein and an Afterword by John Durham Peters (Hardback)
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Philosophical Profiles in the Theory of Communication: With a Foreword by Richard J. Bernstein and an Afterword by John Durham Peters (Hardback)

(editor)
£66.95
Hardback 519 Pages / Published: 13/03/2012
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Philosophical Profiles in the Theory of Communication is the first book to draw systematic attention to the theme of communication in twentieth-century academic philosophy. It covers a broad range of philosophical perspectives on communication, including those from analytic philosophy, pragmatism, critical theory, phenomenology, hermeneutics, feminism, psychoanalysis, systems theory, and more. What emerges is a vital, long-neglected story about the theme of communication in late modern academic philosophy. Each chapter features a "profile" of a particular philosophical figure, with a brief intellectual biography, an overview of that figure's contribution to communication theory, and a critical assessment of the significance of that contribution. The clear and accessible organization of the volume makes it ideal for courses in both philosophy and communication studies.

Publisher: Peter Lang Publishing Inc
ISBN: 9781433116469
Number of pages: 519
Weight: 870 g
Dimensions: 230 x 155 x 33 mm
Edition: New edition


MEDIA REVIEWS
"There are many philosophers who have struggled with conceptions of communication, whether in constructing a philosophy of mind, of language, or of being. The editor of this volume has wisely selected the works of philosophers who are less known in the communication literature, yet have something to say to its students and scholars. To shed light on the positions these philosophers have taken, these essays reveal not only their life experiences and personal struggles, but also who influenced them. Thus, the volume reproduces a fascinating network of intellectual connections that can enrich the conversations among present generations of communication theorists. Reading this volume is a pleasure and an encouragement to go on." (Klaus Krippendorff, Gregory Bateson Professor for Cybernetics,
Language, and Culture, University of Pennsylvania)
"Philosophical Profiles in the Theory of Communication extends the discourse in philosophy of communication from its familiar sources in continental thought to include important but relatively neglected twentieth-century figures in analytic philosophy, pragmatism, feminism and other traditions. An impressive group of academic philosophers and communication theorists have contributed chapters, each of which profiles a philosopher's intellectual context, distinct views on communication, and importance for the field. Students as well as professional scholars in communication theory and philosophy will profit from reading this book." (Robert T. Craig, University of Colorado at Boulder)
"There are many philosophers who have struggled with conceptions of communication, whether in constructing a philosophy of mind, of language, or of being. The editor of this volume has wisely selected the works of philosophers who are less known in the communication literature, yet have something to say to its students and scholars. To shed light on the positions these philosophers have taken, these essays reveal not only their life experiences and personal struggles, but also who influenced them. Thus, the volume reproduces a fascinating network of intellectual connections that can enrich the conversations among present generations of communication theorists. Reading this volume is a pleasure and an encouragement to go on." (Klaus Krippendorff, Gregory Bateson Professor for Cybernetics, Language, and Culture, University of Pennsylvania)
"`Philosophical Profiles in the Theory of Communication' extends the discourse in philosophy of communication from its familiar sources in continental thought to include important but relatively neglected twentieth-century figures in analytic philosophy, pragmatism, feminism and other traditions. An impressive group of academic philosophers and communication theorists have contributed chapters, each of which profiles a philosopher's intellectual context, distinct views on communication, and importance for the field. Students as well as professional scholars in communication theory and philosophy will profit from reading this book." (Robert T. Craig, University of Colorado at Boulder)

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