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Mothers of Massive Resistance: White Women and the Politics of White Supremacy (Hardback)
  • Mothers of Massive Resistance: White Women and the Politics of White Supremacy (Hardback)
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Mothers of Massive Resistance: White Women and the Politics of White Supremacy (Hardback)

(author)
£22.99
Hardback 368 Pages / Published: 26/04/2018
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Mothers of Massive Resistance tells the story of how white women shaped racial segregation in the South and postwar conservatism across the nation. Through their work in social welfare, public education, partisan politics, and culture, they created a massive resistance that spanned five decades, and continues to mobilize local communities and survive legislative defeat.

Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 9780190271718
Number of pages: 368
Weight: 670 g
Dimensions: 241 x 163 x 28 mm


MEDIA REVIEWS

"A strikingly original and unsettling analysis of the 'long segregation movement.' Tracking this struggle to maintain racial difference and distance from the eugenics mania of the 1920s through the watershed of the 1940s to the Boston busing crisis and the rise of the New Right, Elizabeth McRae paints a vivid portrait of hard-working white women in local communities across the country who, drawing on their moral authority as mothers, fought to protect white privilege, sometimes explicitly, through the tactics of massive resistance, sometimes covertly, under the guise of school choice and limited government. A must read for understanding the politics of white supremacy over the past half century and in our own time."--Jacquelyn Dowd Hall, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill


"Women have long been marginalized in studies of segregation, but Mothers of Massive Resistance makes a powerful case for placing them at the center of our attention. In this smartly argued book, Elizabeth McRae shows that southern white women not only brought massive resistance into being, but then sustained its growth at the grassroots in vitally important ways."--Kevin Kruse, Princeton University


"A product of extraordinary research, McRae's gracefully written account captures the critical role white women of the South played in defending segregation even as it exposes the deep-seated cultural assumptions that led them to battle."--Dan Carter, University of South Carolina


"Brilliantly demonstrates how white women were both the everyday architects of white supremacy in the Jim Crow South and fully connected to national movements to enforce racial segregation and promote political conservatism. It excavates the grassroots activism of female segregationists in their roles as suffragists, social workers, eugenicists, school teachers, textbook censors, journalists, storytellers, garden clubbers, party activists, anticommunists, and most of all as wives and mothers."--Matthew Lassiter, author of The Silent Majority: Suburban Politics in the Sunbelt South


"This deeply researched history of women and the work of segregation represents a major revision of Jim Crow and gender history. We see just how widespread and unrelenting, coordinated and feminine anti-integration efforts became over the early and mid-twentieth century--within and beyond the south. Indeed, women were the 'mass in massive resistance.'"--Michelle Nickerson, author of Mothers of Conservatism: Women and the Postwar Right




"The crystal-clear message of this thoroughly researched and impressively documented book is that white supremacy remains a powerful force in the United States."--Kirkus Reviews


"A strikingly original and unsettling analysis of the 'long segregation movement.' Tracking this struggle to maintain racial difference and distance from the eugenics mania of the 1920s through the watershed of the 1940s to the Boston busing crisis and the rise of the New Right, Elizabeth McRae paints a vivid portrait of hard-working white women in local communities across the country who, drawing on their moral authority as mothers, fought to protect white privilege, sometimes explicitly, through the tactics of massive resistance, sometimes covertly, under the guise of school choice and limited government. A must read for understanding the politics of white supremacy over the past half century and in our own time."--Jacquelyn Dowd Hall, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill


"Women have long been marginalized in studies of segregation, but Mothers of Massive Resistance makes a powerful case for placing them at the center of our attention. In this smartly argued book, Elizabeth McRae shows that southern white women not only brought massive resistance into being, but then sustained its growth at the grassroots in vitally important ways."--Kevin Kruse, Princeton University


"A product of extraordinary research, McRae's gracefully written account captures the critical role white women of the South played in defending segregation even as it exposes the deep-seated cultural assumptions that led them to battle."--Dan Carter, University of South Carolina


"Brilliantly demonstrates how white women were both the everyday architects of white supremacy in the Jim Crow South and fully connected to national movements to enforce racial segregation and promote political conservatism. It excavates the grassroots activism of female segregationists in their roles as suffragists, social workers, eugenicists, school teachers, textbook censors, journalists, storytellers, garden clubbers, party activists, anticommunists, and most of all as wives and mothers."--Matthew Lassiter, author of The Silent Majority: Suburban Politics in the Sunbelt South


"This deeply researched history of women and the work of segregation represents a major revision of Jim Crow and gender history. We see just how widespread and unrelenting, coordinated and feminine anti-integration efforts became over the early and mid-twentieth century--within and beyond the south. Indeed, women were the 'mass in massive resistance.'"--Michelle Nickerson, author of Mothers of Conservatism: Women and the Postwar Right




"A valuable addition to the politically urgent study of whiteness in American History."--Anna J. Clutterbuck-Cook, Library Journal, starred review


"The crystal-clear message of this thoroughly researched and impressively documented book is that white supremacy remains a powerful force in the United States."--Kirkus Reviews


"A strikingly original and unsettling analysis of the 'long segregation movement.' Tracking this struggle to maintain racial difference and distance from the eugenics mania of the 1920s through the watershed of the 1940s to the Boston busing crisis and the rise of the New Right, Elizabeth McRae paints a vivid portrait of hard-working white women in local communities across the country who, drawing on their moral authority as mothers, fought to protect white privilege, sometimes explicitly, through the tactics of massive resistance, sometimes covertly, under the guise of school choice and limited government. A must read for understanding the politics of white supremacy over the past half century and in our own time."--Jacquelyn Dowd Hall, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill


"Women have long been marginalized in studies of segregation, but Mothers of Massive Resistance makes a powerful case for placing them at the center of our attention. In this smartly argued book, Elizabeth McRae shows that southern white women not only brought massive resistance into being, but then sustained its growth at the grassroots in vitally important ways."--Kevin Kruse, Princeton University


"A product of extraordinary research, McRae's gracefully written account captures the critical role white women of the South played in defending segregation even as it exposes the deep-seated cultural assumptions that led them to battle."--Dan Carter, University of South Carolina


"Brilliantly demonstrates how white women were both the everyday architects of white supremacy in the Jim Crow South and fully connected to national movements to enforce racial segregation and promote political conservatism. It excavates the grassroots activism of female segregationists in their roles as suffragists, social workers, eugenicists, school teachers, textbook censors, journalists, storytellers, garden clubbers, party activists, anticommunists, and most of all as wives and mothers."--Matthew Lassiter, author of The Silent Majority: Suburban Politics in the Sunbelt South


"This deeply researched history of women and the work of segregation represents a major revision of Jim Crow and gender history. We see just how widespread and unrelenting, coordinated and feminine anti-integration efforts became over the early and mid-twentieth century--within and beyond the south. Indeed, women were the 'mass in massive resistance.'"--Michelle Nickerson, author of Mothers of Conservatism: Women and the Postwar Right


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