Monarchs in a Changing World: Biology and Conservation of an Iconic Butterfly (Hardback)
  • Monarchs in a Changing World: Biology and Conservation of an Iconic Butterfly (Hardback)
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Monarchs in a Changing World: Biology and Conservation of an Iconic Butterfly (Hardback)

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£26.99
Hardback 336 Pages / Published: 07/05/2015
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Monarch butterflies are among the most popular insect species in the world and are an icon for conservation groups and environmental education programs. Monarch caterpillars and adults are easily recognizable as welcome visitors to gardens in North America and beyond, and their spectacular migration in eastern North America (from breeding locations in Canada and the United States to overwintering sites in Mexico) has captured the imagination of the public.Monarch migration, behavior, and chemical ecology have been studied for decades. Yet many aspects of monarch biology have come to light in only the past few years. These aspects include questions regarding large-scale trends in monarch population sizes, monarch interactions with pathogens and insect predators, and monarch molecular genetics and large-scale evolution. A growing number of current research findings build on the observations of citizen scientists, who monitor monarch migration, reproduction, survival, and disease. Monarchs face new threats from humans as they navigate a changing landscape marked by deforestation, pesticides, genetically modified crops, and a changing climate, all of which place the future of monarchs and their amazing migration in peril. To meet the demand for a timely synthesis of monarch biology, conservation and outreach, Monarchs in a Changing World summarizes recent developments in scientific research, highlights challenges and responses to threats to monarch conservation, and showcases the many ways that monarchs are used in citizen science programs, outreach, and education. It examines issues pertaining to the eastern and western North American migratory populations, as well as to monarchs in South America, the Pacific and Caribbean Islands, and Europe. The target audience includes entomologists, population biologists, conservation policymakers, and K-12 teachers.Contributors: Anurag A. Agrawal, Cornell University; Jared G. Ali, Michigan State University; Sonia Altizer, University of Georgia; Michael C. Anderson, Eden Prairie, Minnesota; Sophia M. Anderson, Eden Prairie, Minnesota; Kim Bailey, Georgia Department of Natural Resources; Rebecca Batalden, University of Minnesota; Kristen A. Baum, Oklahoma State University; Scott Hoffman Black, Xerces Society for Invertebrate Conservation; Brianna Borders, Xerces Society for Invertebrate Conservation; Lincoln P. Brower, Sweet Briar College; Wendy Caldwell, University of Minnesota; Mariana Cantu-Fernandez, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico; Nicola Chamberlain, Harvard University; Sonya Charest, Montreal Insectarium; Andrew K. Davis, University of Georgia; Alma De Anda, Covina, California; Guadalupe del Rio Pesado, Alternare, A.C., Mexico; Janet Kudell-Ekstrum, USDA Forest Service; Linda S. Fink, Sweet Briar College; Mark Fishbein, Oklahoma State University; Juan Fernandez-Haeger, University of Cordoba, Spain; Eligio Garcia Serrano, Fondo Monarca, Mexico; Mark Garland, Cape May Monarch Monitoring Project; Brian Hayes, Monarch Teacher Network; Elizabeth Howard, Journey North; Mark D. Hunter, University of Michigan; Sarina Jepsen, Xerces Society for Invertebrate Conservation; Diego Jordano, University of Cordoba, Spain; Matthew C. Kaiser, University of Minnesota; Ridlon J. Kiphart, Texas Master Naturalists; Marcus R. Kronforst, University of Chicago; Jim Lovett, University of Kansas; Eric Lee-Mader, Xerces Society for Invertebrate Conservation; Stephen B. Malcolm, Western Michigan University; Hector Martinez-Torres, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico; Susan Meyers, Stone Mountain Memorial Association; Erik A. Mollenhauer, Monarch Teacher Network; Mia Monroe, Xerces Society for Invertebrate Conservation; Eneida B. Montesinos-Patino, Monarch Butterfly Fund; Gail M. Morris, Southwest Monarch Study; Elisha K. Mueller, Oklahoma State University; Kelly R. Nail, University of Minnesota; Karen S. Oberhauser, University of Minnesota; Diego R. Perez-Salicrup, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico; Amanda A. Pierce, Emory University; John Pleasants, Iowa State University; Victoria Pocius, University of Kansas; Robert Michael Pyle, Northwest Lepidoptera Survey; M. Isabel Ramirez, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico; Sergio Rasmann, University of California, Irvine; Gerald Rehfeldt, USDA Forest Service; Eduardo Rendon-Salinas, World Wildlife Fund-Mexico; Leslie Ries, National Socio-Environmental Synthesis Center; Jacobus C. de Roode, Emory University; Richard G. RuBino, Florida State University; Ann Ryan, University of Kansas; Cuauhtemoc Saenz-Romero, Universidad Michoacana de San Nicolas de Hidalgo; Lidia Salas-Canela, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico; Phil Schappert, Biophilia Consulting; Priya C. Shahani, Oregon State University; Benjamin H. Slager, Western Michigan University; Michelle J. Solensky, University of Jamestown; Douglas J. Taron, Chicago Academy of Sciences/Peggy Notebaert Nature Museum; Orley R. Taylor, University of Kansas; Rocio Trevino, Proteccion de la Fauna Mexicana A.C.; Francis X. Villablanca, California Polytechnic State University; Dick Walton, New Jersey Audubon/Cape May Bird Observatory; Ernest H. Williams, Hamilton College; Elisabeth Young-Isebrand, University of Minnesota; Myron P. Zalucki, University of Queensland; Raul R. Zubieta, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico

Publisher: Cornell University Press
ISBN: 9780801453151
Number of pages: 336
Weight: 936 g
Dimensions: 254 x 178 x 28 mm


MEDIA REVIEWS

"Monarch butterflies, by being so familiar to so many, provide an immediate connection between readers and research. That connection can overcome the small patches of difficult prose. With 926 citations of scientific papers and a 463-entry index, this book will help advance thework of established researchers and give others an awareness of the breadth and limits of the knowledge of the monarch butterfly."

-- G.C. Stevens * Choice *

"Monarchs in a Changing World summarizes work that reinforces, extends, and ameliorates our understanding of the biology of the monarch butterfly, with a particular focus on key research, conservation, and outreach efforts that aim to preserve this species, its range and habitats, and its awe-inspiring long-distance migration in eastern North America. This book presents a variety of interesting and thought-provoking topics to readers. They range from studies on the population dynamics and ecology of monarchs in different areas around the globe to current and ongoing conservation and management efforts that span personal, local, state, national, and international boundaries. This book will serve as the key resource for those people interested in using monarch butterflies as a model organism in citizen science, science literacy, and environmental education programs."

-- Steven M. Reppert, MD, Distinguished Professor of Neurobiology and Higgins Family Professor of Neuroscience, University of Massachusetts Medical School

"Few other species capture the imagination and provide fodder for knowledge and innovation like the monarch. Monarchs in a Changing World is a beautiful illustration of both."

-- Jessica Hellmann, University of Notre Dame

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