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Imaging the Early Medieval Bible - Pennsylvania State Series in the History of the Book (Paperback)
  • Imaging the Early Medieval Bible - Pennsylvania State Series in the History of the Book (Paperback)
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Imaging the Early Medieval Bible - Pennsylvania State Series in the History of the Book (Paperback)

(author)
£36.95
Paperback 256 Pages / Published: 21/01/2002
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Traditionally, historians of biblical illustration have maintained that the subjects and format of Bible illustration were largely determined by archetypes of the earliest years of Christian artistic culture. In this book, John Williams and four other prominent mediaeval scholars challenge this conventional wisdom and find the illustration and decoration of the Bible to be an enterprise essentially guided in its genesis by the dynamics of a new culture. First, John Lowden asserts that biblical manuscript illumination is more likely to have derived from, than to have inspired, biblical monumental painting. Katrin Kogman-Appel provides a thorough survey of the debate over how Jewish motifs entered Christian art. In her discussion of Roman manuscript art, Dorothy Verkerk proposes that the celebrated Ashburnham Pentateuch, rather than the hypothetical Leo Bible proffered by Koehler, should be taken as a witness to the capital's approach to Bible illustration and the kind of model sent to the monastic sciptoria north of the Alps. Lawrence Nees presents the northern Bibles, Insular and Carolingian, as individual commissions for specific donors made at certain specific moments in time. Finally, John Williams studies the Bible of 960 in Leon, an ideal vehicle to examine the premises underlying reigning theories of the evolution of Bible illustration. Although its format and extensive imagery have been taken as a sign that it reflected early stages of Bible illustration, it stands revealed as owing little to pictorial traditions. Taken together, these essays present the argument that illustrated and decorated Bibles were shaped by ad hoc decisions that resulted in a creative variety of approaches.

Publisher: Pennsylvania State University Press
ISBN: 9780271021690
Number of pages: 256
Weight: 830 g
Dimensions: 279 x 216 x 15 mm
Edition: New edition


MEDIA REVIEWS

"This book belongs on the bookshelf of every (medieval) art historian."

--Jens T. Wollesen, Papers of the Bibliographical Society of Canada


This book belongs on the bookshelf of every (medieval) art historian.

Jens T. Wollesen, Papers of the Bibliographical Society of Canada"


"The five contributors to Imaging the Early Medieval Bible effectively challenge Weitzmann's stranglehold on their discipline by focussing less on 'iconographic genealogies' and more on the revolutionary aspects of early medieval biblical illustration, the unique cultural and liturgical contexts of early medieval luxury Bibles, and Jewish-Christian artistic and exegetical exchange in late antiquity. I found this book to be extremely valuable, both in terms of the historiographical issues it raises and its clear and concise treatment of the latest theories in the field of early medieval art history."

--Lynda L. Coon, Religious Studies Review


"Foremost in [the contributors' or maybe the volume's] critique, which I share, is Weitzmann's displacement of the focus of art-historical attention from the material artifact at hand to an imagined set of antecedents. . . . these self-consciously revisionist studies provide a valuable picture of present-day moods and concerns on topics surrounding the illumination of biblical texts in the early Middle Ages."

--Walter Cahn, Speculum: A Journal of Medieval Studies


"With its oversized dimensions, large type on high-quality glossy paper, and breathtaking photos of extraordinary rare manuscripts, Imaging the Early Medieval Bible could easily pass as a 'coffee-table' book one might find in a well-educated church official's home. It thus could easily be passed over by serious scholars, but that would be a mistake."

--Norbert A. Wethington, Christianity and Literature


The five contributors to Imaging the Early Medieval Bible effectively challenge Weitzmann s stranglehold on their discipline by focussing less on iconographic genealogies and more on the revolutionary aspects of early medieval biblical illustration, the unique cultural and liturgical contexts of early medieval luxury Bibles, and Jewish-Christian artistic and exegetical exchange in late antiquity. I found this book to be extremely valuable, both in terms of the historiographical issues it raises and its clear and concise treatment of the latest theories in the field of early medieval art history.

Lynda L. Coon, Religious Studies Review"


Foremost in [the contributors or maybe the volume s] critique, which I share, is Weitzmann s displacement of the focus of art-historical attention from the material artifact at hand to an imagined set of antecedents. . . . these self-consciously revisionist studies provide a valuable picture of present-day moods and concerns on topics surrounding the illumination of biblical texts in the early Middle Ages.

Walter Cahn, Speculum: A Journal of Medieval Studies"


With its oversized dimensions, large type on high-quality glossy paper, and breathtaking photos of extraordinary rare manuscripts, Imaging the Early Medieval Bible could easily pass as a coffee-table book one might find in a well-educated church official s home. It thus could easily be passed over by serious scholars, but that would be a mistake.

Norbert A. Wethington, Christianity and Literature"


This book belongs on the bookshelf of every (medieval) art historian.

Jens T. Wollesen, Papers of the Bibliographical Society of Canada

"

The five contributors to Imaging the Early Medieval Bible effectively challenge Weitzmann s stranglehold on their discipline by focussing less on iconographic genealogies and more on the revolutionary aspects of early medieval biblical illustration, the unique cultural and liturgical contexts of early medieval luxury Bibles, and Jewish-Christian artistic and exegetical exchange in late antiquity. I found this book to be extremely valuable, both in terms of the historiographical issues it raises and its clear and concise treatment of the latest theories in the field of early medieval art history.

Lynda L. Coon, Religious Studies Review

"

Foremost in [the contributors or maybe the volume s] critique, which I share, is Weitzmann s displacement of the focus of art-historical attention from the material artifact at hand to an imagined set of antecedents. . . . these self-consciously revisionist studies provide a valuable picture of present-day moods and concerns on topics surrounding the illumination of biblical texts in the early Middle Ages.

Walter Cahn, Speculum: A Journal of Medieval Studies

"

With its oversized dimensions, large type on high-quality glossy paper, and breathtaking photos of extraordinary rare manuscripts, Imaging the Early Medieval Bible could easily pass as a coffee-table book one might find in a well-educated church official s home. It thus could easily be passed over by serious scholars, but that would be a mistake.

Norbert A. Wethington, Christianity and Literature

"

"This book belongs on the bookshelf of every (medieval) art historian."

--Jens T. Wollesen, Papers of the Bibliographical Society of Canada


"The five contributors to Imaging the Early Medieval Bible effectively challenge Weitzmann's stranglehold on their discipline by focussing less on 'iconographic genealogies' and more on the revolutionary aspects of early medieval biblical illustration, the unique cultural and liturgical contexts of early medieval luxury Bibles, and Jewish-Christian artistic and exegetical exchange in late antiquity. I found this book to be extremely valuable, both in terms of the historiographical issues it raises and its clear and concise treatment of the latest theories in the field of early medieval art history."

--Lynda L. Coon, Religious Studies Review


"Foremost in [the contributors' or maybe the volume's] critique, which I share, is Weitzmann's displacement of the focus of art-historical attention from the material artifact at hand to an imagined set of antecedents. . . . these self-consciously revisionist studies provide a valuable picture of present-day moods and concerns on topics surrounding the illumination of biblical texts in the early Middle Ages."

--Walter Cahn, Speculum: A Journal of Medieval Studies


"With its oversized dimensions, large type on high-quality glossy paper, and breathtaking photos of extraordinary rare manuscripts, Imaging the Early Medieval Bible could easily pass as a 'coffee-table' book one might find in a well-educated church official's home. It thus could easily be passed over by serious scholars, but that would be a mistake."

--Norbert A. Wethington, Christianity and Literature


"Foremost in [the volume contributors'] critique, which I share, is Weitzmann's displacement of the focus of art-historical attention from the material artifact at hand to an imagined set of antecedents. . . . these self-consciously revisionist studies provide a valuable picture of present-day moods and concerns on topics surrounding the illumination of biblical texts in the early Middle Ages."

--Walter Cahn, Speculum: A Journal of Medieval Studies


"With its . . . breathtaking photos of extraordinary rare manuscripts, Imaging the Early Medieval Bible could easily pass as a 'coffee-table' book one might find in a well-educated church official's home. It thus could easily be passed over by serious scholars, but that would be a mistake."

--Norbert A. Wethington, Christianity and Literature

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