Globetrotting: African American Athletes and Cold War Politics - Sport and Society (Hardback)
  • Globetrotting: African American Athletes and Cold War Politics - Sport and Society (Hardback)
zoom

Globetrotting: African American Athletes and Cold War Politics - Sport and Society (Hardback)

(author)
£49.00
Hardback 232 Pages / Published: 24/09/2012
  • We can order this

Usually dispatched within 2 weeks

  • This item has been added to your basket
Throughout the Cold War, the Soviet Union deplored the treatment of African Americans by the U.S. government as proof of hypocrisy in the American promises of freedom and equality. This probing history examines government attempts to manipulate international perceptions of U.S. race relations during the Cold War by sending African American athletes abroad on goodwill tours and in international competitions as cultural ambassadors and visible symbols of American values. Damion L. Thomas follows the State Department's efforts from 1945 to 1968 to showcase prosperous African American athletes including Jackie Robinson, Jesse Owens, and the Harlem Globetrotters as the preeminent citizens of the African Diaspora rather than as victims of racial oppression. With athletes in baseball, track and field, and basketball, the government relied on figures whose fame carried the desired message to countries where English was little understood. However, eventually African American athletes began to provide counter-narratives to State Department claims of American exceptionalism, most notably with Tommie Smith and John Carlos's famous black power salute at the 1968 Mexico City Olympics.

Publisher: University of Illinois Press
ISBN: 9780252037177
Number of pages: 232
Weight: 476 g
Dimensions: 229 x 152 x 25 mm


MEDIA REVIEWS
"This accessible, interesting history will broaden sport historians' understanding of sport and the civil rights movement, injecting an internationalist framework that was critical to the viewpoint of the era's African American athletes."--Aram Goudsouzian, author of King of the Court: Bill Russell and the Basketball Revolution
"Provides an extensive chronology of how racial identity unfolded during the Cold War years, using sport as a ploy that all was well in the U.S. Recommended." -- Choice
"Globetrotting reveals surprising evidence of the importance the U.S. government placed on sports in waging the Cold War, and makes compelling arguments regarding the changing tenor of African American athletes' involvement in foreign policy initiatives amid the changing climate of the civil rights movement."--American Historical Review



"Thomas effectively highlights the essential role of propaganda in addressing Cold War diplomatic concerns, and he situates both race and black athletes at the heart of the United States government's effort to win the hearts and minds of formerly colonized peoples around the world."--Journal of American Studies

"This story demonstrates the complex position of African American athletes within the Cold War and how developments in sport reflected intellectual shifts within the broader civil rights movement, as athletes worked through liberal and then radical approaches to reform."--Sport in History

You may also be interested in...

Running with the Kenyans
Added to basket
It's a Hill, Get Over it
Added to basket
Advanced Marathoning
Added to basket
Gold Rush
Added to basket
£9.99
Paperback
Finding Ultra, Edition
Added to basket
£13.99
Paperback
The Dirtiest Race in History
Added to basket
How to Run
Added to basket
£14.99
Paperback
Born to Run
Added to basket
£9.99   £7.99
Paperback
Twin Tracks
Added to basket
£9.99
Paperback
What I Talk About When I Talk About Running
Added to basket
Swim, Bike, Run
Added to basket
£9.99   £8.99
Paperback
Can't Swim, Can't Ride, Can't Run
Added to basket
The Art of Running Faster
Added to basket
Eat and Run
Added to basket
£8.99
Paperback
Feet in the Clouds
Added to basket

Reviews

Please sign in to write a review

Your review has been submitted successfully.