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Genre Screenwriting: How to Write Popular Screenplays That Sell (Paperback)
  • Genre Screenwriting: How to Write Popular Screenplays That Sell (Paperback)
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Genre Screenwriting: How to Write Popular Screenplays That Sell (Paperback)

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£19.99
Paperback 176 Pages / Published: 15/12/2008
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This book reveals the secrets of writing a successful screenplay across a range of genres. It's simple: films need to have commercial value for the studios to produce them, distributors to sell them and cinemas to screen them. While talent definitely plays a part in the writing process, it can be the well-executed formulaic approaches to the popular genres that will first get you noticed in the industry."Genre Screenwriting: How to Write Popular Film Genre Screenplays That Sell" does not attempt to probe in the deepest psyche of screenwriters and directors of famous or seminal films, nor does it attempt to analyze the deep theoretic machinations of films. Duncan's simple goal is to give the reader a practical guide to writing each popular film genre. Employing diverse methods to illustrate his processes, Duncan provides a one-stop shop for novices, screenwriters and professionals alike.

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing PLC
ISBN: 9780826429933
Number of pages: 176
Weight: 272 g
Dimensions: 216 x 138 x 13 mm


MEDIA REVIEWS
"[This book] reveals the secrets of a successful screenplay across a range of genres and employs a variety of methods to illustrate the processes" Writer's Forum, December 2008
In this useful and approachable offering, screenwriter Duncan (whose film credits include A Man Called Hawk and Tour of Duty) provides aspiring screenwriters with the tools to write the most popular genres on the big screen, including action-adventure, thriller, science fiction and fantasy, horror-fantasy, and romantic comedy. Duncan breaks down the elements of each genre, showing readers how the protagonist, the antagonist, and the supporting characters function within the structure of the plot. Duncan uses his own spec scripts for dialogue and format tips and transforms fairy tales like Little Red Riding Hood and Goldilocks and the Three Bears into examples of various genres. In addition to his own work, Duncan references popular films in each category and shows how they typify their respective genres. At the end of the book, he offers suggestions for marketing and attempting to sell the finished screenplay. Indie aficionados might turn up their noses, but Duncan's handy how-to is a practical, accessible guide for those eager to work in popular contemporary movies."-Booklist
"Duncan (screenwriting, Loyola Marymount Univ.; A Guide to Screenwriting) concentrates here on the nuts and bolts of writing commercial screenplays. He explores each of the five primary film genres and a few subgenres to help readers understand the formula for each well enough to write and perhaps sell a successful screenplay of their own. Although not aiming for a general screenwriting primer, Duncan gives a brief overview on screenwriting basics. He uses his own speculative scripts, based on reworked fairy tales, as illustrations for each genre covered...Each chapter closes with helpful textual notes; appendixes provide worksheets for genre and character development." -Stacey Rae Brownlie, Library Journal, February 1, 2009

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