Echoes of Mutiny: Race, Surveillance, and Indian Anticolonialism in North America (Hardback)
  • Echoes of Mutiny: Race, Surveillance, and Indian Anticolonialism in North America (Hardback)
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Echoes of Mutiny: Race, Surveillance, and Indian Anticolonialism in North America (Hardback)

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£94.00
Hardback 288 Pages / Published: 02/10/2014
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How did thousands of Indians who migrated to the Pacific Coast of North America during the early twentieth century come to forge an anticolonial movement that British authorities claimed nearly toppled their rule in India during the First World War? Seema Sohi traces how Indian labor migrants, students, and intellectual activists who journeyed across the globe seeking to escape the exploitative and politically repressive policies of the British Raj, linked restrictive immigration policies and political repression in North America to colonial subjugation at home. In the process, they developed an international anticolonial consciousness that boldly confronted the British and American empires. Hoping to become an important symbol for those battling against racial oppression and colonial subjugation across the world, Indian anticolonialists also provoked a global inter-imperial collaboration between U.S. and British officials to repress anticolonial revolt. They symbolized the hope of the world's racialized subjects and the fears of those who worried about the global disorder they could portend. Echoes of Mutiny provides an in-depth and transnational look at the deeply intertwined relationship between anti-Asian racism, Indian anticolonialism, and state antiradicalism in early twentieth century U.S. and global history. Through extensive archival research, Sohi uncovers the dialectical relationship between the rise of Indian anticolonialism and state repression in North America and demonstrates how Indian anticolonialists served as catalysts for the implementation of restrictive U.S. immigration and antiradical laws as well as the expansion of state power in early twentieth century India and America. Indian migrants came to understand their struggles against racial exclusion and political repression in North America as part of a broader movement against white supremacy and colonialism and articulated radical visions of anticolonialism that called not only for the end of British rule in India but the forging of democracies across the world.

Publisher: Oxford University Press Inc
ISBN: 9780199376247
Number of pages: 288
Weight: 538 g
Dimensions: 237 x 162 x 20 mm


MEDIA REVIEWS
Echoes of Mutiny draws from archives rarely looked at seriously and makes an argument that is deceptively simple. Sohi draws a dialectical connection between Indian anticolonial radicalism in North America with the growth of state repression in the United States and in Canada. As these countries tightened the web against Reds, it pushed many migrants to a much more radical consciousness about their own status in the US and Canada, and as they went in a more radical direction it spurred the states of this region toward policies of immigration restriction and state surveillance. This Mobius strip of repression-radicalism whipped round and round spinning the migrants toward a more radical position on Indian nationalism than nationalists who remained in British India, and pushing the state to bar migrants from Asia altogether. * Vijay Prashad, author of Uncle Swami: South Asians in America Today *
In Echoes of Mutiny, Seema Sohi provides us with an expansive account of the radicalism-and the repression -of a group of Indian anti-imperialists who found a short-lived home in the United States of the early 20th century. While historians of South Asia have often treated these expatriate radicals as a small overseas outpost of the Indian independence movement, Sohi draws on a range of archival evidence to make a bolder argument: that members and associates of the Ghadar party were simultaneously contesting British colonialism and U.S. racialization and exclusion-and that their experiences produced a vision of revolutionary change that was global rather than merely national in its scope... Sohi's work is transnational history at its best: it is as dense, complex, and deeply researched as it is beautifully written. * Vivek Bald, author of Bengali Harlem and the Lost Histories of South Asian America *

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