Domestic Intersections in Contemporary Migration Fiction: Homing the Metropole - Routledge Research in Postcolonial Literatures (Hardback)
  • Domestic Intersections in Contemporary Migration Fiction: Homing the Metropole - Routledge Research in Postcolonial Literatures (Hardback)
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Domestic Intersections in Contemporary Migration Fiction: Homing the Metropole - Routledge Research in Postcolonial Literatures (Hardback)

(author)
£110.00
Hardback 208 Pages / Published: 29/01/2020
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Homing the Metropole presents a new approach to diasporic fiction that reorients postcolonial readings of migration away from processes of displacement and rupture towards those of placement and homemaking. While notions of home have frequently been associated with essentialist understandings of nation and race, an uncritical investment in tropes of homelessness can prove equally hegemonic. By synthesising postcolonial and intersectional feminist theory, this work establishes the migrant domestic space as a central location of resistance, countering notions of the private sphere as static, uncreative and apolitical. Through close readings of fiction emerging from the African, Caribbean and South Asian diasporas, it reassesses our conception of home in light of contemporary realities of globalisation and forced migration, providing a valuable critique of the celebration of unfixed subject positions that has been a central tenet of postcolonial studies.

Publisher: Taylor & Francis Ltd
ISBN: 9781138308114
Number of pages: 208
Dimensions: 229 x 152 mm


MEDIA REVIEWS

"In this politically sensitive and timely book, Lucinda Newns challenges critical orthodoxies in order to revise the correlation of domestic space with insularity, normativity, and stasis. By showing how migrant fiction evokes alternative practices of homemaking, her intersectional readings offer a multifaceted contribution to the study of belonging in postcolonial, feminist, and queer studies." David James, University of Birmingham

"In this era of homelessness and displacement, home is not automatically a safe space. Lucinda Newns shows that for migrants, LGBTQI people, women, and refugees, home is a process striated by violence and enforced uprooting. Her important new book updates postcolonial discussions of home for this complex and fraught twenty-first century era." Claire Chambers, University of York

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