We regret that due to the technical limitations of our site, we are unable to offer eBooks or Audio Downloads to customers outside of the UK.

For further details please read our eBooks help.

Defining the Common Good: Empire, Religion and Philosophy in Eighteenth-Century Britain - Ideas in Context (Paperback)
  • Defining the Common Good: Empire, Religion and Philosophy in Eighteenth-Century Britain - Ideas in Context (Paperback)

Defining the Common Good: Empire, Religion and Philosophy in Eighteenth-Century Britain - Ideas in Context (Paperback)

, , , ,
£44.99
Paperback Published: 16/12/2004
  • Not in our warehouse

We can order it, but could take up to 3 weeks

  • This item has been added to your basket

The theme of this book is the crisis of the early modern state in eighteenth-century Britain. The revolt of the North American colonies and the simultaneous demand for wider religious toleration at home challenged the principles of sovereignty and obligation that underpinned arguments about the character of the state. These were expressed in terms of the 'common good', 'necessity', and 'community' - concepts that came to the fore in early modern European political thought and which gave expression to the problem of defining legitimate authority in a period of increasing consciousness of state power. The Americans and their British supporters argued that individuals ought to determine the common good of the community. A new theory of representation and freedom of thought defines the cutting edge of this revolutionary redefinition of the basic relationship between individual and community.

Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9780521617123

You may also be interested in...

Your review has been submitted successfully.

View your review