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Cynthia Ozick's Fiction: Tradition & Invention (Hardback)
  • Cynthia Ozick's Fiction: Tradition & Invention (Hardback)
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Cynthia Ozick's Fiction: Tradition & Invention (Hardback)

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£33.00
Hardback 292 Pages / Published: 22/03/1993
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" ...a rare combination of painstaking scholarship with dazzling critical intelligence and inventiveness. I expect that Kauvar will do for Ozick what F. R. Leavis once did for D. H. Lawrence - establish her as one of the distinctive and profound voices of twentieth-century fiction." - Edward Alexander. Cynthia Ozick's emphasis on tradition has made her, paradoxically, one of the most innovative writers of our time. Elaine M. Kauvar illuminates the intricacies of Ozick's texts, explores the dynamics of her creativity, and excavates her sources, contexts, and allusions. She provides readings of all of Ozick's fiction from her first published novel, "Trust", through "The Messiah of Stockholm". Working chronologically, Kauvar traces the development of the storyteller's thought and art, examines the themes that pervade Ozick's tales - the battle between Hebraism and Hellenism, the lure of paganism and the dangers of idolatry, the implications and consequences of assimilation, the perplexities of the artist and the besetting dangers of art - and demonstrates the dialectic existing between her tales, their shifting perspectives, and competing ideas. Precisely because Ozick draws on the resources in her heritage, Kauvar concludes, she transcends narrow categories and defies rigid ideologies.

Publisher: Indiana University Press
ISBN: 9780253331298
Number of pages: 292
Weight: 500 g
Dimensions: 235 x 156 mm


MEDIA REVIEWS

"Superb novelists deserve first -- rate literary analysis. Cynthia Ozickhas found such critics in Joseph Lowin, Victor Strandberg, and most recently inElaine Kauvar, whose present work is simultaneously a profound contribution to Ozickinterpretation and an astonishingly readable account of the novelist's ideas andartistic manner. Kauvar accounts for Ozick's views antithetical to those of T.S.Eliot; yet she observes Ozick's allegiance to the judgements of history, her conceptof tradition as itself innovation and advances current conjecture that Cynthia Ozickmay eventually be judged our T.S. Eliot. Unlike some contemporary critics, whodecontextualize literature, Kauvar offers a contextual examination of Ozick'srecurrent themes, demonstrates Ozick's relationship to her artistic predecessors, and illuminates patterns and textual interconnections to reveal the substructure anddoubling of the texts and establish the author's place in contemporary Americanletters. Although Kauvar echoes es


"Superb novelists deserve first--rate literary analysis. Cynthia Ozick has found such critics in Joseph Lowin, Victor Strandberg, and most recently in Elaine Kauvar, whose present work is simultaneously a profound contribution to Ozick interpretation and an astonishingly readable account of the novelist's ideas and artistic manner. Kauvar accounts for Ozick's views antithetical to those of T.S. Eliot; yet she observes Ozick's allegiance to the judgements of history, her concept of tradition as itself innovation and advances current conjecture that Cynthia Ozick may eventually be judged our T.S. Eliot. Unlike some contemporary critics, who decontextualize literature, Kauvar offers a contextual examination of Ozick's recurrent themes, demonstrates Ozick's relationship to her artistic predecessors, and illuminates patterns and textual interconnections to reveal the substructure and doubling of the texts and establish the author's place in contemporary American letters. Although Kauvar echoes established critical studies in her emphasis on the conflict between Hebraism and Hellenism, the perils of art, and the consequences of assimilation, she propels some of these concepts to surprising ends such as her interpretation of the Holocaust novella, Rosa, in light of the Aeneid, her perception of the overarching concern with the father in the fiction, and her attention to flower and color imagery. Kauvar faults critics who focus on the Jewishness of Ozick's work, arguing that such a view cannot illuminate any of the intricacies of the fiction; few critics, however, do exhibit the exclusivity she attributes to them. Kauvar herself places Ozick centrally in Hebraic, Hellenic, and American literary traditions. Highly recommended." --S. L./P>--S. L. Kremer, Kansas State University"Choice" (01/01/1993)


Superb novelists deserve first--rate literary analysis. Cynthia Ozick has found such critics in Joseph Lowin, Victor Strandberg, and most recently in Elaine Kauvar, whose present work is simultaneously a profound contribution to Ozick interpretation and an astonishingly readable account of the novelist's ideas and artistic manner. Kauvar accounts for Ozick's views antithetical to those of T.S. Eliot; yet she observes Ozick's allegiance to the judgements of history, her concept of tradition as itself innovation and advances current conjecture that Cynthia Ozick may eventually be judged our T.S. Eliot. Unlike some contemporary critics, who decontextualize literature, Kauvar offers a contextual examination of Ozick's recurrent themes, demonstrates Ozick's relationship to her artistic predecessors, and illuminates patterns and textual interconnections to reveal the substructure and doubling of the texts and establish the author's place in contemporary American letters. Although Kauvar echoes established critical studies in her emphasis on the conflict between Hebraism and Hellenism, the perils of art, and the consequences of assimilation, she propels some of these concepts to surprising ends such as her interpretation of the Holocaust novella, Rosa, in light of the Aeneid, her perception of the overarching concern with the father in the fiction, and her attention to flower and color imagery. Kauvar faults critics who focus on the Jewishness of Ozick's work, arguing that such a view cannot illuminate any of the intricacies of the fiction; few critics, however, do exhibit the exclusivity she attributes to them. Kauvar herself places Ozick centrally in Hebraic, Hellenic, and American literary traditions. Highly recommended.--S. L. Kremer, Kansas State University""Choice"" (01/01/1993)


"Superb novelists deserve first rate literary analysis. Cynthia Ozick has found such critics in Joseph Lowin, Victor Strandberg, and most recently in Elaine Kauvar, whose present work is simultaneously a profound contribution to Ozick interpretation and an astonishingly readable account of the novelist's ideas and artistic manner. Kauvar accounts for Ozick's views antithetical to those of T.S. Eliot; yet she observes Ozick's allegiance to the judgements of history, her concept of tradition as itself innovation and advances current conjecture that Cynthia Ozick may eventually be judged our T.S. Eliot. Unlike some contemporary critics, who decontextualize literature, Kauvar offers a contextual examination of Ozick's recurrent themes, demonstrates Ozick's relationship to her artistic predecessors, and illuminates patterns and textual interconnections to reveal the substructure and doubling of the texts and establish the author's place in contemporary American letters. Although Kauvar echoes established critical studies in her emphasis on the conflict between Hebraism and Hellenism, the perils of art, and the consequences of assimilation, she propels some of these concepts to surprising ends such as her interpretation of the Holocaust novella, Rosa, in light of the Aeneid, her perception of the overarching concern with the father in the fiction, and her attention to flower and color imagery. Kauvar faults critics who focus on the Jewishness of Ozick's work, arguing that such a view cannot illuminate any of the intricacies of the fiction; few critics, however, do exhibit the exclusivity she attributes to them. Kauvar herself places Ozick centrally in Hebraic, Hellenic, and American literary traditions. Highly recommended." S. L. Kremer, Kansas State University, Choice, September 1993"


"Superb novelists deserve first--rate literary analysis. Cynthia Ozick has found such critics in Joseph Lowin, Victor Strandberg, and most recently in Elaine Kauvar, whose present work is simultaneously a profound contribution to Ozick interpretation and an astonishingly readable account of the novelist's ideas and artistic manner. Kauvar accounts for Ozick's views antithetical to those of T.S. Eliot; yet she observes Ozick's allegiance to the judgements of history, her concept of tradition as itself innovation and advances current conjecture that Cynthia Ozick may eventually be judged our T.S. Eliot. Unlike some contemporary critics, who decontextualize literature, Kauvar offers a contextual examination of Ozick's recurrent themes, demonstrates Ozick's relationship to her artistic predecessors, and illuminates patterns and textual interconnections to reveal the substructure and doubling of the texts and establish the author's place in contemporary American letters. Although Kauvar echoes established critical studies in her emphasis on the conflict between Hebraism and Hellenism, the perils of art, and the consequences of assimilation, she propels some of these concepts to surprising ends such as her interpretation of the Holocaust novella, Rosa, in light of the Aeneid, her perception of the overarching concern with the father in the fiction, and her attention to flower and color imagery. Kauvar faults critics who focus on the Jewishness of Ozick's work, arguing that such a view cannot illuminate any of the intricacies of the fiction; few critics, however, do exhibit the exclusivity she attributes to them. Kauvar herself places Ozick centrally in Hebraic, Hellenic, and American literary traditions. Highly recommended." --S. L. Kremer, Kansas State University, Choice, September 1993

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