Credit and Community: Working-Class Debt in the UK since 1880 (Hardback)
  • Credit and Community: Working-Class Debt in the UK since 1880 (Hardback)
zoom

Credit and Community: Working-Class Debt in the UK since 1880 (Hardback)

(author)
£110.00
Hardback 318 Pages / Published: 22/01/2009
  • We can order this

Usually dispatched within 3 weeks

  • This item has been added to your basket
Credit and Community examines the history of consumer credit and debt in working class communities. Concentrating on forms of credit that were traditionally very dependent on personal relationships and social networks, such as mail-order catalogues and co-operatives, it demonstrates how community-based arrangements declined as more impersonal forms of borrowing emerged during the twentieth century. Tallymen and check traders moved into doorstep moneylending during the 1960s, but in subsequent decades the loss of their best working class customers, owing to increased spending power and the emergence of a broader range of credit alternatives, forced them to focus on the 'financially excluded'. This 'sub-prime' market was open for exploitation by unlicensed lenders, and Sean O'Connell offers the first detailed historical investigation of illegal moneylending in the UK, encompassing the 'she usurers' of Edwardian Liverpool and the violent loan sharks of Blair's Britain. O'Connell contrasts such commercial forms of credit with formal and informal co-operative alternatives, such as 'diddlum clubs', 'partners', and mutuality clubs. He provides the first history of the UK credit unions, revealing the importance of Irish and Caribbean immigrant volunteers, and explains the relative failure of the movement compared with Ireland. Drawing on a wide range of neglected sources, including the archives of consumer credit companies, the records of the co-operative and credit union movements, and government papers, Credit and Community makes a strong contribution to historical understandings of credit and debt. Oral history testimony from both sides of the credit divide is used to telling effect, offering key insights into the complex nature of the relationship between borrowers and lenders.

Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 9780199263318
Number of pages: 318
Weight: 525 g
Dimensions: 222 x 149 x 23 mm


MEDIA REVIEWS
[A] careful and thorough study of the role of credit in working-class communities in Britain from the late nineteenth century to the present... [an] informative study. * Peter Gurney, 20th Century British History *
Credit's centrality to the current economic crisis makes the publication of Sean O'Connell's social history of working-class credit consumption particularly timely. Although the credit crunch came too late to be included in this book, the portrait of a complex relationship between lenders and borrowers over the past 120 years should be required reading for those suggesting we are living on the brink of a new economic epoch. * Times Higher Education *

You may also be interested in...

The Rational Optimist
Added to basket
The Ascent of Money
Added to basket
The Age Of Capital
Added to basket
£14.99
Paperback
False Economy
Added to basket
£9.99
Paperback
The Money Machine
Added to basket
£10.99
Paperback
Lords of Finance
Added to basket
£10.99
Paperback
The Great Degeneration
Added to basket
Dogs and Demons
Added to basket
£14.99
Paperback
The Making of the English Working Class
Added to basket
The Drove Roads of Scotland
Added to basket
The Great Hunger
Added to basket
Kicking Away the Ladder
Added to basket

Reviews

Please sign in to write a review

Your review has been submitted successfully.