Concubines in Court: Marriage and Monogamy in Twentieth-Century China (Hardback)
  • Concubines in Court: Marriage and Monogamy in Twentieth-Century China (Hardback)
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Concubines in Court: Marriage and Monogamy in Twentieth-Century China (Hardback)

(author)
£60.00
Hardback 244 Pages / Published: 01/06/2015
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This groundbreaking book analyzes marriage and family reform in modern China. As the first in-depth study of the meaning and practice of monogamy and concubinage, Tran's work makes an important contribution to our understanding of Chinese society and legal norms. Poised at the intersection of Chinese history, women's history, and legal history, this book makes a significant contribution to all three fields.

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield
ISBN: 9781442245891
Number of pages: 244
Weight: 503 g
Dimensions: 234 x 159 x 23 mm


MEDIA REVIEWS
Concubinage has a long and intricate history in China, where it was a deeply entrenched part of the institution of marriage. How did it make the transition into post-dynastic China? Lisa Tran tackles this issue in a thorough and masterful way, taking the reader through the complex dismantling of concubinage in the pre- and post-communist eras. She attends to both legal and social/ideological aspects, drawing on an impressive array of documents and archives. Concubines in Court treats one of the most important facets of the historical transition from post-dynastic times and is a study that I have long awaited. -- Keith McMahon, University of Kansas
Lisa Tran's study of the legal treatment of concubinage during the transition from late empire to Republic and then People's Republic will be required reading for anyone interested in gender, family, and law in modern China. Polygyny had been standard practice and an important status symbol under the Qing dynasty, but new ideals of monogamy and gender equality in the twentieth century induced reformers to redefine concubinage first as adultery and then as bigamy. Based on careful exegesis of cases from legal archives, Tran shows how concubines took advantage of their changing status to secure new rights in court. She also shows how Republican-era debates about concubinage strangely anticipated the controversy over wealthy men's pursuit of sexual privilege in China today. -- Matthew Sommer, Stanford University

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