Communicator-in-Chief: How Barack Obama Used New Media Technology to Win the White House - Lexington Studies in Political Communication (Paperback)
  • Communicator-in-Chief: How Barack Obama Used New Media Technology to Win the White House - Lexington Studies in Political Communication (Paperback)
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Communicator-in-Chief: How Barack Obama Used New Media Technology to Win the White House - Lexington Studies in Political Communication (Paperback)

(editor), (editor)
£29.95
Paperback 188 Pages / Published: 14/01/2010
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Communicator-in-Chief examines the role of new media technologies such as e-mail, Twitter, Facebook, MySpace, YouTube, blogs, video games, texting and the Internet in the historic 2008 presidential campaign. Politicians of the twenty-first century will use the Obama campaign's new media technology strategy to not only communicate with the electorate, but also raise money and motivate voters to go to the polling places on election day.

Publisher: Lexington Books
ISBN: 9780739141069
Number of pages: 188
Weight: 299 g
Dimensions: 233 x 154 x 12 mm


MEDIA REVIEWS
Communicator-in-Chief is the first comprehensive treatment of the evolution and current status of new media in American election campaigns. Focusing on the game-changing election of 2008, the contributors in this impressive collection of essays explore the many ways in which digital technology, including email, Web 2.0 applications, blogs, social networking platforms, blogs, twitter, and viral videos, shapes the the relationship between candidates and voters. The essays are smart and engaging, and are well-suited for classroom use, especially as the volume addresses the significance of new communication forms for young voters. -- Diana Owen, Georgetown University
Hendricks (Stephen F. Austin State Univ.) and Denton (Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State Univ.) have edited a useful and informative book, gathering an array of essays from nine knowledgeable contributors that explore the political watershed resulting in Barack Obama's election. Hendricks and Denton present a comprehensive opening chapter; other contributors discuss ways the Internet and related electronic vehicles that constitute social media contributed mightily to President Obama's win. Not sinceJohn Kennedy adroitly used television in 1960 has a White House aspirant so successfully adapted media's potential to fashion a convincing victory. The contributors lucidly explain the new methodology, which now becomes a template for future campaigns. Selective means of communication is the key; Hispanic and African American group usages were specifically targeted through varied electronic means. This tactic increased the effectiveness and importance of the local caucuses for the Obama forces, and thatproved to be the Achilles' heel of the formidable Clinton campaign. The unanswered question: will Obama's followers remain a cohesive, decisive force? An excellent primer. All would-be officeholders will ignore the lessons here at their peril. Highly reco * CHOICE, September 2010 *
Communicator-in-Chief: How Barack Obama Used New Media Technology to Win the White House will be a welcome read for cyber-enthusiasts. As witnessed in the foregoing excerpt, this richly detailed volume depicts the unprecedented online efforts of the victorious 2008 Barack Obama campaign....the volume is a must-read. * Presidential Studies Quarterly *
Zhou Enlai was once asked about the effects of the French Revolution and answered, famously, "It's too early to tell." Likewise, those of us living at the initial churning of the tidal wave of social media's effect on culture, society, and politics would be wise not to make any sweeping conclusions about the future too soon. Communicator-in-Chief is an excellent first start at understanding the age of Politics 2.0, where political candidates and campaigns, following President Obama's victory, will increasingly struggle to find ways to build online interactivity with supporters and voters. Covering all social media from MySpace to YouTube, the book presents a lively, interesting, and accessible survey about how the 2008 elections differed from all others and yet encapsulated some basic principles of political communication. The book will be useful both in the classroom and for the professional. -- David D. Perlmutter, author of Blogwars: The New Political Battleground
Hendricks (Stephen F. Austin State Univ.) and Denton (Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State Univ.) have edited a useful and informative book, gathering an array of essays from nine knowledgeable contributors that explore the political watershed resulting in Barack Obama's election. Hendricks and Denton present a comprehensive opening chapter; other contributors discuss ways the Internet and related electronic vehicles that constitute social media contributed mightily to President Obama's win. Not since John Kennedy adroitly used television in 1960 has a White House aspirant so successfully adapted media's potential to fashion a convincing victory. The contributors lucidly explain the new methodology, which now becomes a template for future campaigns. Selective means of communication is the key; Hispanic and African American group usages were specifically targeted through varied electronic means. This tactic increased the effectiveness and importance of the local caucuses for the Obama forces, and that proved to be the Achilles' heel of the formidable Clinton campaign. The unanswered question: will Obama's followers remain a cohesive, decisive force? An excellent primer. All would-be officeholders will ignore the lessons here at their peril. Highly recommended. All readership levels. * CHOICE, September 2010 *
The strengths of this book are that each dedicated chapter succinctly explained the Obama campaign's new media strategies within the historic context of political climate and technology development, in addition to thoroughly recording the execution, obstacles, mistakes, successes, and failures of each new media campaign strategy....The book delightfully documents the level of unsolicited and spontaneous voter involvement....This book provides a valuable and enlightening insight that simultaneously challenges and educates us; it's a good read for students, practitioners, teachers, and scholars alike. * Journal of Broadcasting & Electronic Media *

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