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Class Conflict: The Pursuit and History of American Justice (Hardback)
  • Class Conflict: The Pursuit and History of American Justice (Hardback)
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Class Conflict: The Pursuit and History of American Justice (Hardback)

(editor)
£80.99
Hardback 264 Pages / Published: 30/04/2013
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In a just society the law not only applies to all equally, but also arises from the consent of the people it embraces. As such, justice implies that people have access to governance. A just society provides and guards social and individual rights for all its members. The freedom of speech, therefore, is a right of all, and society has institutionalized processes to guarantee that freedom.

Due to the American people's understanding of exclusion and rank, the meaning of justice was fragmented by social status and class. While this book views American justice through a prism of social-class conflict, Gregory C. Leavitt argues that it would be incorrect to portray this perspective as somehow whole. American justice is relative to many cultural groupings and conditions and is thus at the same distance from its encompassing ideal understood by common Americans.

Beginning with the late eighteenth century and ending in the late twentieth century, Leavitt traces the history of class conflict and the struggle for justice among Americans. He argues that class struggles remain a significant factor in American social problems, because the American situation grew out of government promises of freedom and liberty to the lower class and the development of a powerful middle class. This is a provocative contribution to the debate over the future of social justice in America.

Publisher: Taylor & Francis Inc
ISBN: 9781412849791
Number of pages: 264
Weight: 454 g
Dimensions: 229 x 152 x 20 mm


MEDIA REVIEWS

"[Leavitt] traces the development of the US sense of justice in the context of class conflict, beginning with a broad summary of preagricultural culture. He suggests that class stuggle was unlikely in those preagricultural communitites, as the groups were small, homogenous, and related via blood, clan, or marriage. Progressing into the colonial period of the US, Leavitt reveals how a changing social demographic provided fertile ground for an American notion of justice that would appear in the Constitution and Bill of Rights. Class conflict became more pronounced as the US approached its centennial. The middle class began to mature and coalesce around ideas that were more progressive than those held by the ruling elite. A different notion of justice becamse evident in the many civil rights measures of the 1900s that placed civil liberties above property rights, culminating in the bradening judicial interpretation of due process. Leavitt suggests that the momentum of progressive policy has not been lost, but that the surge of conservative action in recent years serves as proof of the class conflict inherent in US public policy as it relates to notions of justice. . . Recommended."

--F. E. Knowles, Choice


"[Leavitt] traces the development of the US sense of justice in the context of class conflict, beginning with a broad summary of preagricultural culture. He suggests that class struggle was unlikely in those preagricultural communitities, as the groups were small, homogenous, and related via blood, clan, or marriage. Progressing into the colonial period of the US, Leavitt reveals how a changing social demographic provided fertile ground for an American notion of justice that would appear in the Constitution and Bill of Rights. Class conflict became more pronounced as the US approached its centennial. The middle class began to mature and coalesce around ideas that were more progressive than those held by the ruling elite. A different notion of justice became evident in the many civil rights measures of the 1900s that placed civil liberties above property rights, culminating in the broadening judicial interpretation of due process. Leavitt suggests that the momentum of progressive policy has not been lost, but that the surge of conservative action in recent years serves as proof of the class conflict inherent in US public policy as it relates to notions of justice. . . Recommended."

--F. E. Knowles, Choice


-[Leavitt] traces the development of the US sense of justice in the context of class conflict, beginning with a broad summary of preagricultural culture. He suggests that class struggle was unlikely in those preagricultural communitities, as the groups were small, homogenous, and related via blood, clan, or marriage. Progressing into the colonial period of the US, Leavitt reveals how a changing social demographic provided fertile ground for an American notion of justice that would appear in the Constitution and Bill of Rights. Class conflict became more pronounced as the US approached its centennial. The middle class began to mature and coalesce around ideas that were more progressive than those held by the ruling elite. A different notion of justice became evident in the many civil rights measures of the 1900s that placed civil liberties above property rights, culminating in the broadening judicial interpretation of due process. Leavitt suggests that the momentum of progressive policy has not been lost, but that the surge of conservative action in recent years serves as proof of the class conflict inherent in US public policy as it relates to notions of justice. . . Recommended.-

--F. E. Knowles, Choice

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