Chinese Medicinal Plants, Herbal Drugs and Substitutes: an identification guide: An identification guide (Hardback)
  • Chinese Medicinal Plants, Herbal Drugs and Substitutes: an identification guide: An identification guide (Hardback)
zoom

Chinese Medicinal Plants, Herbal Drugs and Substitutes: an identification guide: An identification guide (Hardback)

(author), (author)
£110.00
Hardback 816 Pages / Published: 23/02/2017
  • We can order this

Usually dispatched within 1 week

  • This item has been added to your basket
This is the first botanically authoritative and practical illustrated identification guide to Chinese medicinal plants and drugs and their substitutes. It offers authoritative guidance on the identification of the herbal drugs themselves, and the plants from which they are sourced. Over the past 15 years, the authors have been collecting plant specimens throughout China, using verified species to create typical TCM reference drugs, prepared according to traditional methods. The herbal drugs included in this book are officially recognised from the Chinese materia medica (as defined in the Chinese Pharmacopoeia) and their selection has been based on those popular in international trade, as well as those recognised by the European Herbal and Traditional Medicine Practitioners Association, and those that are easily confused, substituted or adulterated with other plants.

Publisher: Royal Botanic Gardens
ISBN: 9781842463871
Number of pages: 816
Dimensions: 280 x 238 mm


MEDIA REVIEWS
It is well known (if often greatly exaggerated by the media) that the identity of medicinal plants in commerce is sometimes questionable, due to a combination of deliberate adulteration, accidental substitution, and traditional practices that permit multiple, occasionally unrelated species to be used interchangeably. Though many elaborate laboratory methods of authenticating botanicals have been developed, morphological identification remains not only the most accessible and affordable method, but the most rigorous in cases where sufficiently intact and complete material is sold. A variety of works are available to assist in the authentication of botanicals popular in the West, but the best books on Chinese herbs, the basis of an increasingly well-researched and globally exported health care modality, are in Chinese and largely inaccessible to Westerners. This book fills in that gap with a top-quality, beautifully illustrated and exhaustively researched reference work. Each of the included species receives at least a twopage spread, commonly four pages or occasionally more. Treatments include notes on taxonomy, botanical description, natural range and sourcing, Traditional Chinese Medicine properties and Western indications, description of the macromorphology of the crude drug, notes on processing methods, Chinese common names and their translation, notes on known safety issues, allowable and unofficial substitutes, and photos of living plants and crude drugs. The authors conducted field expeditions in 21 Chinese provinces to collect vouchered material and take photos of live plants. Most photos are of very good quality, and descriptions are clearly written. As examples, the treatment for Shan Yao (Dioscorea polystachya rhizome) includes four pictures of the live plant, one of an herbarium specimen, one of baskets of rhizome pieces, two of variously treated whole rhizomes, and three of sliced rhizomes subjected to different types of processing. Thetreatment for Yin Chen (Artemisia scoparia herb) includes three photos of the live plant and five at various magnifications of two different named types of dried material collected at different growth stages, five photos of the second allowable pharmacopoeial species (Artemisia capillaris), five photos of the unofficial substitute Origanum vulgare (confused due to the name Tu Yin Chen), and a text box with the Latin and Chinese names and key morphological distinctions of four unofficial Artemisia species reported in the TCM literature as substitutes. Comparable thoroughness is typical throughout. Though of course it is not possible for any single volume to include all TCM herbs, this work includes enough, as treated species or as substitutes, to cover most of those that will be frequently encountered. Multiple bilingual indices make the information easy to find. While this volume will become an essential reference for those ethnobotanists who wind up employed in the herbal industry, it will have value also for those doing research on Asian traditional medicine, e.g., by facilitating the identification of materials purchased for market studies or acquired from practitioners without associated vouchers. The authors are to be congratulated for a superb contribution to the literature, which I certainly expect to make use of for a lifetime. -- WENDY L. APPLEQUIST * ECONOMIC BOTANY *

You may also be interested in...

Candida Albicans
Added to basket
£9.99
Paperback
What the Foot?
Added to basket
£34.99
Paperback
Hypnotherapy
Added to basket
£38.99
Paperback
The Reiki Bible
Added to basket
£14.99
Paperback
The Candida Free Cookbook
Added to basket
Born to Walk
Added to basket
£19.99
Paperback
Acupressure
Added to basket
£6.99
Fold-out book or chart
Trigger Points
Added to basket
£6.00
Fold-out book or chart
Essential Reiki
Added to basket
£15.99
Paperback
Anatomy
Added to basket
£65.00
Paperback
The Reiki Manual
Added to basket
£16.99
Paperback

Please sign in to write a review

Your review has been submitted successfully.