Your Waterstones card is changing, introducing...
TELL ME MORE
Children's Literature and British Identity: Imagining a People and a Nation (Hardback)
  • Children's Literature and British Identity: Imagining a People and a Nation (Hardback)
zoom

Children's Literature and British Identity: Imagining a People and a Nation (Hardback)

(author)
£65.00
Hardback 222 Pages / Published: 12/04/2012
  • We can order this

Usually despatched within 3 weeks

  • This item has been added to your basket
Children's Literature and British Identity: Imagining a People and a Nation is the story of the development of English children's literature, focusing on how stories inspire children to adhere to the values of society. Such English authors as Lewis Carroll, J.R.R. Tolkien, and J.K. Rowling have entertained, inspired, confronted social wrongs, and transmitted cultural values-functions previously associated with folklore. Their stories form a new folklore tradition that grounds personal identity, provides social glue, and supports a love of England and English values. This book examines how this tradition came to fruition.

Publisher: Scarecrow Press
ISBN: 9780810885165
Number of pages: 222
Weight: 490 g
Dimensions: 239 x 161 x 20 mm


MEDIA REVIEWS
This is an informative, readable survey of the best-known literary works in English written for children from the mid-18th century to the present. Throughout, Knuth (library and information science, Univ. of Hawai'i) engages the issue of nomenclature, noting the distinction between "Britishness" and "Englishness," the latter term being more atmospheric, perhaps affectionate, and (despite the book's title) more widely suggested by the works discussed. Major shifts in the depiction of childhood and youth are treated, especially as they shaped national character. One example is the impact of WW I on young men trained in the "ethos of prewar Englishness (the logical extension of Romantic patriotism was dying for England)," which boys absorbed through reading Victorian and Edwardian school and adventure stories that "set them up to serve as cannon fodder." Especially useful is Knuth's discussion of the development of picture books and their illustrators, in particular Walter Crane, Randolph Caldecott, and Kate Greenaway, who profoundly influenced public taste. Summing Up: Recommended. * CHOICE *
This valuable text deserves a place in large public and university libraries and on the departmental reference shelves of young adult literature and ethics curricula. * American Reference Books Annual *
The key to this book lies. . . in its structure. First and foremost, this is a potted history of British children's literature, identifying the dominant concerns of each era, also managing to be thematic. . . . As a primer on the history of children's literature, Knuth's book does have its appeal - it is succinct and perceptive in its analysis of the chosen authors and books. . . . Knuth is seeking to identify the values and attitudes that have underpinned British children's literature, and show how these changed over time, absorbing new ideas which reflected the evolving national consciousness. * Children's Books History Society *

You may also be interested in...

The Cat
Added to basket
£11.99
Paperback
The Irresistible Fairy Tale
Added to basket
A Little History of Literature
Added to basket
The Complete Fairy Tales
Added to basket
The Annotated Alice
Added to basket
To Do
Added to basket
£25.00
Hardback
Beatrix Potters Gardening Life
Added to basket
The Child that Books Built
Added to basket
Exploring Children's Literature
Added to basket
A Little History of Literature
Added to basket
Walking with Beatrix Potter
Added to basket

Reviews

Please sign in to write a review

Your review has been submitted successfully.