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Cambridge Social and Cultural Histories: The Channel: England, France and the Construction of a Maritime Border in the Eighteenth Century Series Number 23 (Paperback)
  • Cambridge Social and Cultural Histories: The Channel: England, France and the Construction of a Maritime Border in the Eighteenth Century Series Number 23 (Paperback)
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Cambridge Social and Cultural Histories: The Channel: England, France and the Construction of a Maritime Border in the Eighteenth Century Series Number 23 (Paperback)

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£22.99
Paperback 417 Pages / Published: 30/11/2017
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Rather than a natural frontier between natural enemies, this book approaches the English Channel as a shared space, which mediated the multiple relations between France and England in the long eighteenth century, in both a metaphorical and a material sense. Instead of arguing that Britain's insularity kept it spatially and intellectually segregated from the Continent, Renaud Morieux focuses on the Channel as a zone of contact. The 'narrow sea' was a shifting frontier between states and a space of exchange between populations. This richly textured history shows how the maritime border was imagined by cartographers and legal theorists, delimited by state administrators and transgressed by migrants. It approaches French and English fishermen, smugglers and merchants as transnational actors, whose everyday practices were entangled. The variation of scales of analysis enriches theoretical and empirical understandings of Anglo-French relations, and reassesses the question of Britain's deep historical connections with Europe.

Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9781108441841
Number of pages: 417
Weight: 600 g
Dimensions: 230 x 153 x 21 mm


MEDIA REVIEWS
'Morieux offers a useful corrective to the new British history or 'archipelagic studies', whose challenge to Anglocentric history has a tendency to overlook Europe. It's a cliche to say a book is timely, but in the midst of another debate on borders this book presents a bigger picture.' Willy Maley, Times Higher Education
'Morieux's work here indicates in exemplary fashion how much more difficult to define was the political and juridical status of a murky, evershifting, and often downright dangerous stretch of water. Morieux repeatedly plays off the overlaps and tensions between the economic and political realms, noting further in the conclusion how merchants might balance natal allegiance with naturalization elsewhere.' David Andress, The American Historical Review
'A rich and rewarding text, based on extensive research on both sides of la Manche, The Channel opens new perspectives on the sea as a connection, and the fluidity of maritime space.' Andrew Lambert, International Journal of Maritime History
'... a powerful antidote and alternative perspective to those who see Anglo-French relations only through the prism of conflict. It is a profoundly optimistic view and in that, as much as in the subject it deals with, it is a timely and welcome intervention.' John McAleer, The English Historical Review
'Morieux offers a useful corrective to the new British history or 'archipelagic studies', whose challenge to Anglocentric history has a tendency to overlook Europe. It's a cliche to say a book is timely, but in the midst of another debate on borders this book presents a bigger picture.' Willy Maley, Times Higher Education
'Morieux's work here indicates in exemplary fashion how much more difficult to define was the political and juridical status of a murky, evershifting, and often downright dangerous stretch of water. Morieux repeatedly plays off the overlaps and tensions between the economic and political realms, noting further in the conclusion how merchants might balance natal allegiance with naturalization elsewhere.' David Andress, The American Historical Review
`A rich and rewarding text, based on extensive research on both sides of la Manche, The Channel opens new perspectives on the sea as a connection, and the fluidity of maritime space.' Andrew Lambert, International Journal of Maritime History
'... a powerful antidote and alternative perspective to those who see Anglo-French relations only through the prism of conflict. It is a profoundly optimistic view and in that, as much as in the subject it deals with, it is a timely and welcome intervention.' John McAleer, The English Historical Review

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