BSA Bantam Bible: All Models 1948 to 1971 - Bible (Hardback)
  • BSA Bantam Bible: All Models 1948 to 1971 - Bible (Hardback)
zoom

BSA Bantam Bible: All Models 1948 to 1971 - Bible (Hardback)

(author)
£29.99
Hardback 160 Pages / Published: 24/07/2008
  • Not available

This product is currently unavailable.

  • This item has been added to your basket
The BSA Bantam is one of the definitive postwar British bikes, perhaps the definitive British lightweight built after World War II. It was certainly the most popular, with over 400,000 built over a 23-year production run - in the first four years, production broke all records. Yet it would die a lingering death, production fizzling out in the early 1970s as a neglected model of a manufacturer more concerned with building big, fast road-burning bikes. The Bantam might never have happened without World War II. The prewar DKW RT125 was offered to the Allies as reparations, taken up and produced in the USA, USSR, even Japan. In East Germany it was revived as the MZ, and in Britain it surfaced publicly in 1948 as the BSA Bantam, a very simple little 123cc two-stroke, with rudimentary electrics, no rear suspension and a lot of charm. The little bike became part of Britain's social history. Thousands of people learnt to ride on a Bantam, or had their first pillion experience on one, or rode one delivering telegrams for what was the GPO. Although many of those learners progressed to bigger, faster bikes, then gave up two wheels for family life, they won't have forgotten the Bantam, which explains why there's such a thriving Bantam community to this day - the club, the racing club, the spares specialists, and restorers, owners and riders all over the country. This might not be Britain's most glamorous motorcycle, its fastest or most flamboyant, but the Bantam is probably the most loved.

Publisher: Veloce Publishing Ltd
ISBN: 9781845841591
Number of pages: 160
Weight: 880 g
Dimensions: 250 x 207 x 20 mm


MEDIA REVIEWS
inter-bike.co.uk, 2008
UK biker website
Written by Peter Henshaw this is the latest in the 'bible' series published by Veloce and features all the BSA Bantam range from 1948 until their demise in 1971. In terms of subject matter it is probably the least exotic machinery to be covered in the series, but follows the same tried and trusted format that has been used before with good effect.
While most of us might not readily admit it, we have all owned a Bantam at some stage in our British motorcycling career and regarded it as something of a utility machine, not something to be loved and cherished. However, within the 160 pages of this lavishly illustrated hardback are reasons to take a different look at the bike next time you see one at a show, or even in your garage! Contained among the historical and mechanical information is testimony from owners who have raced and rallied them and have enjoyed quite extensive motorcycle careers on the humble two-stroke design that came from DKW after the war. The last chapter, as always, explains what it is like to run and own one of the machines profiled in the book, before ending with a very comprehensive set of appendices. These give not only figures, but a comprehensive list of year by year changes to help any restorer or historian identify a particular machine. As always it is well laid out and illustrated with the usual mix of modern and period images as well as advertising and period documentation, with the odd pencil drawing thrown in. The paper quality and general finish of this hardback is excellent and the whole book is an entertaining read about one of Britain best loved machines, all for $59.95.
inter-bike.co.uk, 2008
UK biker website

Written by Peter Henshaw this is the latest in the 'bible' series published by Veloce and features all the BSA Bantam range from 1948 until their demise in 1971. In terms of subject matter it is probably the least exotic machinery to be covered in the series, but follows the same tried and trusted format that has been used before with good effect.
While most of us might not readily admit it, we have all owned a Bantam at some stage in our British motorcycling career and regarded it as something of a utility machine, not something to be loved and cherished. However, within the 160 pages of this lavishly illustrated hardback are reasons to take a different look at the bike next time you see one at a show, or even in your garage! Contained among the historical and mechanical information is testimony from owners who have raced and rallied them and have enjoyed quite extensive motorcycle careers on the humble two-stroke design that came from DKW after the war. The last chapter, as always, explains what it is like to run and own one of the machines profiled in the book, before ending with a very comprehensive set of appendices. These give not only figures, but a comprehensive list of year by year changes to help any restorer or historian identify a particular machine. As always it is well laid out and illustrated with the usual mix of modern and period images as well as advertising and period documentation, with the odd pencil drawing thrown in. The paper quality and general finish of this hardback is excellent and the whole book is an entertaining read about one of Britain best loved machines, all for $59.95.
"Nicely produced, with a wide range of illustrations, this book should interest any Bantam-lover. It's not just about bikes as they left the factory, there is also plenty of coverage of competition use, both on-road and off." - Teme Valley Times

"Poetry in motion, useful appendices including frame numbers and details of model changes." - Classic Bike

inter-bike.co.uk, 2008
UK biker website


Written by Peter Henshaw this is the latest in the 'bible' series published by Veloce and features all the BSA Bantam range from 1948 until their demise in 1971. In terms of subject matter it is probably the least exotic machinery to be covered in the series, but follows the same tried and trusted format that has been used before with good effect.
While most of us might not readily admit it, we have all owned a Bantam at some stage in our British motorcycling career and regarded it as something of a utility machine, not something to be loved and cherished. However, within the 160 pages of this lavishly illustrated hardback are reasons to take a different look at the bike next time you see one at a show, or even in your garage! Contained among the historical and mechanical information is testimony from owners who have raced and rallied them and have enjoyed quite extensive motorcycle careers on the humble two-stroke design that came from DKW after the war. The last chapter, as always, explains what it is like to run and own one of the machines profiled in the book, before ending with a very comprehensive set of appendices. These give not only figures, but a comprehensive list of year by year changes to help any restorer or historian identify a particular machine. As always it is well laid out and illustrated with the usual mix of modern and period images as well as advertising and period documentation, with the odd pencil drawing thrown in. The paper quality and general finish of this hardback is excellent and the whole book is an entertaining read about one of Britain best loved machines, all for $59.95.

You may also be interested in...

Great Motorcycle Tours of Europe
Added to basket
my cool scooter
Added to basket
£14.99
Hardback
Classic British Motorcycles
Added to basket
British Motorcycles of the 1940s and 50s
Added to basket
Classic British Bikes
Added to basket
Harley-Davidson
Added to basket
£7.99
Paperback
Red Tape and White Knuckles
Added to basket
The Motorbike Book
Added to basket
DK
£25.00
Hardback
Total Control
Added to basket
£19.99
Paperback
Bikers' Britain
Added to basket
£12.99
Spiral bound
Sons of Thunder
Added to basket
£11.99
Paperback
BMW Motorcycles
Added to basket
£12.99
Paperback

Please sign in to write a review

Your review has been submitted successfully.