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British Empiricism and American Pragmatism: New Directions and Neglected Arguments (Paperback)
  • British Empiricism and American Pragmatism: New Directions and Neglected Arguments (Paperback)
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British Empiricism and American Pragmatism: New Directions and Neglected Arguments (Paperback)

(author)
£26.99
Paperback 205 Pages / Published: 01/01/1993
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This volume contributes to the remarkable resurgence in interest in American pragmatism and its proponents, William James, C.S. Peirce and John Dewey by focusing on the influence of British empiricism, especially the philosophies of Locke and Hume, and the sharp differences between the two traditions. It is Roth's contention that American pragmatism, sometimes called America's first "indigenous" philosophy, has something significant to say philosophically not only for America, but for the world. Here, the author claims, the lines of development and divergence between British empiricism and American pragmatism have not been sufficiently developed. Perhaps the basic philosophic move that the pragmatists make is from atomism to unity, from diversity to identity, from discontinuity to continuity. The book shows that this move added a rich dimension that has profound effects. Some of the themes explored in the volume are: causality and necessary connection; person and personal identity; and moral, social and political philosophy. A particular perspective of Roth's study is a conscious attempt to trace the lines of thought from classical empiricism to pragmatism, showing the influence of empiricism on pragmatism, as well as their profound differences. Along the way, the pragmatists' dialogue with classical idealism is also indicated.

Publisher: Fordham University Press
ISBN: 9780823213924
Number of pages: 205
Weight: 340 g
Dimensions: 229 x 152 x 19 mm


MEDIA REVIEWS
This volume comprises revisions of Roth's previously published articles, tied together as a comparison of the empiricisms of Locke and Hume with the pragmatisms of Peirce, James, and Dewey. The chapters "Experience," "Cause and Effect, and Necessary Connection," and "Personal Identity" each summarize and discuss the five philosphers' views on the topic. The longest two chapters treat separately the moral, social, and political theories of the empiricists (Ch. 4) and the pragmatists (Ch. 5). Roth indicates the advances pragmatic empiricism makes over classical empiricism, while calling both inadequate. His statement that the question of personal identity had to be addressed first, with careful exclusion of the other dimensions of the person, before taking up social questions is a telling clue for understanding Roth's conclusion that the pragmatists' (primarily Dewey's) social self is too narrow and that the moral concept of obligation ultimately requires the creative activity of God and a renewed natural law theory. Accessible to undergraduates. * -Choice *
Clearly written, thoroughly researched, intelligently organized . . . * -International Philosophical Quarterly *

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