Asia's Flying Geese: How Regionalization Shapes Japan - Cornell Studies in Political Economy (Paperback)
  • Asia's Flying Geese: How Regionalization Shapes Japan - Cornell Studies in Political Economy (Paperback)
zoom

Asia's Flying Geese: How Regionalization Shapes Japan - Cornell Studies in Political Economy (Paperback)

(author)
£22.99
Paperback 304 Pages / Published: 15/06/2010
  • Publisher out of stock

Currently unavailable to order

This product is currently unavailable.

  • This item has been added to your basket

In Asia's Flying Geese, Walter F. Hatch tackles the puzzle of Japan's paradoxically slow change during the economic crisis it faced in the 1990s. Why didn't the purportedly unstoppable pressures of globalization force a rapid and radical shift in Japan's business model? In a book with lessons for the larger debate about globalization and its impact on national economies, Hatch shows how Japanese political and economic elites delayed-but could not in the end forestall-the transformation of their distinctive brand of capitalism by trying to extend it to the rest of Asia. For most of the 1990s, the region grew rapidly as an increasingly integrated but hierarchical group of economies. Japanese diplomats and economists came to call them "flying geese." The "lead goose" or most developed economy, Japan, supplied the capital, technology, and even developmental norms to second-tier "geese" such as Singapore and South Korea, which themselves traded with Thailand, Malaysia, and the Philippines, and so on down the V-shaped line to Indonesia and coastal China. Japan's model of capitalism, which Hatch calls "relationalism," was thus fortified, even as it became increasingly outdated.

Japanese elites enjoyed enormous benefits from their leadership in the region as long as the flock found ready markets for their products in the West. The decade following the collapse of Japan's real estate and stock markets would, however, see two developments that ultimately eroded the country's economic dominance. The Asian economic crisis in the late 1990s destabilized many of the surrounding economies upon which Japan had in some measure depended, and the People's Republic of China gained new prominence on the global scene as an economic dynamo. These changes, Hatch concludes, have forced real transformation in Japan's corporate governance, its domestic politics, and in its ongoing relations with its neighbors.

Publisher: Cornell University Press
ISBN: 9780801476471
Number of pages: 304
Weight: 28 g
Dimensions: 235 x 155 x 16 mm


MEDIA REVIEWS

"In this important new book, Walter Hatch offers an original and convincing explanation for some of this stasis [in Japan's economic situation], examining how regionalization strategies sustained Japan's model of capitalism well past its sell-by date.... It is a fascinating story of how Japan managed globalization, and resisted its impulses temporarily through a strategy of regionalization. Drawing on the flying geese metaphor, Hatch explains how the lead goose, Japan, deployed its capital, technology and norms to the Asian flock, thereby bolstering its system even as it was becoming increasingly dysfunctional."

-- Jeff Kingston * Japan Times *

You may also be interested in...

Modern Greece
Added to basket
£10.99
Paperback
After Hegemony
Added to basket
£30.00
Paperback
A Brief History of Neoliberalism
Added to basket
Finance and the Good Society
Added to basket
Capitalism: A Very Short Introduction
Added to basket
Stress Test
Added to basket
£9.99
Paperback
Capitalism and Freedom
Added to basket
Socialism: A Very Short Introduction
Added to basket
The Rotten Heart of Europe
Added to basket
The Rift
Added to basket
£9.99
Paperback
The Globalization Paradox
Added to basket
House of Debt
Added to basket
£11.50
Paperback
Polarizing Development
Added to basket
Vietnam
Added to basket
£12.99
Paperback
The Wages of Destruction
Added to basket
The Fourth Revolution
Added to basket

Please sign in to write a review

Your review has been submitted successfully.