Visit our Christmas Gift Finder
Aristotle on Religion (Hardback)
  • Aristotle on Religion (Hardback)
zoom

Aristotle on Religion (Hardback)

(author)
£75.00
Hardback 198 Pages / Published: 02/11/2017
  • We can order this

Usually dispatched within 2 weeks

  • This item has been added to your basket
Aristotle is a severe critic of traditional religion, believing it to be false, yet he also holds that traditional religion and its institutions are necessary if any city, including the ideal city he describes in the Politics, is to exist and flourish. This book provides, for the first time, a coherent account of the socio-political role which Aristotle attributes to traditional religion despite his rejection of its content. Mor Segev argues that Aristotle thinks traditional religion is politically necessary because it prepares the ground for what he considers the pinnacle of human endeavor: attaining the knowledge of first philosophy, whose objects are real beings worthy of being called gods. Developing this interpretation, Segev goes on to analyze Aristotle's references to the myths of traditional Greek religion, and to assess his influence on medieval Jewish and Christian theology and philosophy of religion.

Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9781108415255
Number of pages: 198
Weight: 410 g
Dimensions: 235 x 155 x 14 mm


MEDIA REVIEWS
'Here is the problem: Aristotle seems clearly to reject the traditional Olympian gods. His own conception of god (see especially Metaphysics) seems to have no religious significance; for whatever else this god knows (a subject of much debate), it certainly does not know particulars, including humans and their characters, actions, and futures ... In Aristotle on Religion, Segev superbly lays out the problem and offers a solution that does not attempt to resurrect the Olympian gods, and that goes beyond mere social stability.' Robert Mayhew, Journal of the History of Philosophy
'Here is the problem: Aristotle seems clearly to reject the traditional Olympian gods. His own conception of god (see especially Metaphysics) seems to have no religious significance; for whatever else this god knows (a subject of much debate), it certainly does not know particulars, including humans and their characters, actions, and futures ... In Aristotle on Religion, Segev superbly lays out the problem and offers a solution that does not attempt to resurrect the Olympian gods, and that goes beyond mere social stability.' Robert Mayhew, Journal of the History of Philosophy

You may also be interested in...

The Order of Time
Added to basket
£12.99
Hardback
I Am Dynamite!
Added to basket
£25.00   £22.99
Hardback
How to Own the Room
Added to basket
£12.99
Hardback
The Daily Stoic
Added to basket
£10.99   £7.99
Paperback
Renaissance Nation
Added to basket
Wabi Sabi
Added to basket
£12.99
Hardback
A Little History of Philosophy
Added to basket
£9.99   £7.99
Paperback
The Road Less Travelled
Added to basket
Utopia for Realists
Added to basket
Meditations
Added to basket
£10.00
Hardback
Silence
Added to basket
£8.99   £6.99
Paperback
So You've Been Publicly Shamed
Added to basket
£8.99   £6.99
Paperback
12 Rules for Life
Added to basket
£20.00   £16.00
Hardback
Ikigai
Added to basket
£12.99   £9.99
Hardback
Happy
Added to basket
£8.99
Paperback
Enlightenment Now
Added to basket
£12.99
Paperback

Reviews

Please sign in to write a review

Your review has been submitted successfully.