Archetypes, Imprecators, and Victims of Fate: Origins and Developments of Satire in Black Drama (Hardback)
  • Archetypes, Imprecators, and Victims of Fate: Origins and Developments of Satire in Black Drama (Hardback)
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Archetypes, Imprecators, and Victims of Fate: Origins and Developments of Satire in Black Drama (Hardback)

(author)
£67.00
Hardback 216 Pages / Published: 11/12/1989
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In searching for a definitive concept of black theatre, Euba delves deeply into the Yoruba culture and gods, specifically the attributes and ritual of Esu-Elegbara. The resulting vision goes beyond the standard interpretations to place Esu, the fate god, squarely at the center of Yoruba ritual and drama, and by extension, at the center of the black writer's concept of character, actor, and audience as victims of fate and satire. The first section of the book explores the essence of man in the black world of survival. The second, and main section, seeks to develop a concept of drama in black theatre (in African and the New World experience) from the point of view of Esu-Elegbara. The text is highlighted by various illustrations. Three tables outline the Agents of Satire: Imprecator; Imprecator/Satirist; and Satirist/Agent. A bibliography, notes, and an index will help the scholar who wishes to further explore this rich and complex subject. The book is a sophisticated study that will be of great interest to students seeking to understand African influences on black culture today. Potential markets for the book include university-level black history, literature, or culture studies. A broader market might be found among theatre practitioners and students of modern drama.

Publisher: ABC-CLIO
ISBN: 9780313255571
Number of pages: 216
Weight: 482 g
Dimensions: 234 x 156 x 14 mm


MEDIA REVIEWS
"Black literary works from Africa and the diaspora are here assessed for the degree to which they express the satiric essence of Esu, the Yoruba god whose roles include messenger of the supreme gods; judge and instrument of fate, vengeance, or justice; manumitter; and mediator. Detailed comparisons are drawn between Esu-inspired satire and the ancient Western satirists, especially Archilochus and Juvenal. Satire is described as an indictment both by and to a fate ultimately determined by the victim's character. The satiric fate may be destructive or restorative; it may be epidemic' and apply to the character and destiny of a whole people. Esu is discussed not as a metaphor or belief, but an existing divinity, manifest in art, but also in the historical experiences (such as slavery) and contemporary political and social realities (such as Nigerian traffic and dash'). The preliminary discussion of Esu presupposes recondite knowledge of Yoruba religion, archeology, and scholarship, but specific analyses are more perspicuous. Cogent contrasts are found in the works of Wole Soyinka, Derek Walcott, Maurice Glissant, Aime Cesaire, Duro Ladipo, Obotunde Ijimere, Zora Seljam, and Lewis Nkosi. The text will be useful to all who are concerned with black drama of any country, or with new trends in black literary theory."-Choice
?Black literary works from Africa and the diaspora are here assessed for the degree to which they express the satiric essence of Esu, the Yoruba god whose roles include messenger of the supreme gods; judge and instrument of fate, vengeance, or justice; manumitter; and mediator. Detailed comparisons are drawn between Esu-inspired satire and the ancient Western satirists, especially Archilochus and Juvenal. Satire is described as an indictment both by and to a fate ultimately determined by the victim's character. The satiric fate may be destructive or restorative; it may be epidemic' and apply to the character and destiny of a whole people. Esu is discussed not as a metaphor or belief, but an existing divinity, manifest in art, but also in the historical experiences (such as slavery) and contemporary political and social realities (such as Nigerian traffic and dash'). The preliminary discussion of Esu presupposes recondite knowledge of Yoruba religion, archeology, and scholarship, but specific analyses are more perspicuous. Cogent contrasts are found in the works of Wole Soyinka, Derek Walcott, Maurice Glissant, Aime Cesaire, Duro Ladipo, Obotunde Ijimere, Zora Seljam, and Lewis Nkosi. The text will be useful to all who are concerned with black drama of any country, or with new trends in black literary theory.?-Choice

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