American Apostles (Hardback)
  • American Apostles (Hardback)
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American Apostles (Hardback)

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Hardback 400 Pages / Published: 07/09/2015
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On November 3, 1819, Pliny Fisk and Levi Parsons embarked from Boston on the first American mission to the Middle East. A year later they were joined by their friend Jonas King. Poor boys reared on hardscrabble New England farms and steeped in evangelical piety, they imagined themselves martyrs to the cause of converting the world. So too did their large and devoted following in the United States. Christine Leigh Heyrman's American Apostles brilliantly chronicles the first collision between American evangelicalism and the diverse religious cultures of the Levant. The founding members of the "Palestine mission" thrilled readers with tales of crossing the Sinai and exploring Cairo and Jerusalem. But their missions did not go according to plan. The Muslims of the Middle East showed no interest in converting. Instead of saving souls, the New Englanders found themselves engaging scholars in theological debate, marveling at the local folkways, and pursuing an elusive Bostonian convert to Islam. From the start, the American encounter with lslam was an unstable mix of crusading vigor and cosmopolitan curiosity. In the end, Heyrman argues that the failure of the foreign missions movement bolstered a more militant Christianity that became America's unofficial creed. The missionaries did not convert Muslims but they did transform themselves with political and religious legacies that last to this day.

Publisher: Hill & Wang Inc.,U.S.
ISBN: 9780809023981
Number of pages: 400
Weight: 544 g
Dimensions: 228 x 152 x 38 mm


MEDIA REVIEWS

Praise for "Southern Cross
""An extraordinarily rich exploration of the first hundred years of evangelical faith in the South . . . Heyrman has given us a great deal to think about in this wonderfully told and beautifully written story." --Charles B. Dew, "The New York Times Book Review
""This is an outstanding book, impressively saturated with primary sources, beautifully written, and spiced with pervasive wit." --"Kirkus Reviews
"


A striking narrative . . . This is a beautiful book and a delight to read. Americans of the early 19th century found the travels and insights of the missionaries inspiring. They asked new questions of themselves and the world. This reader in the 21st century feels similarly with Heyrman as his guide. Edward J. Blum, "The Chronicle Review"

Heyrman's engaging writing makes even obscure points of doctrine seem exciting and relevant, and her focus on the ambitions and misgivings of the diverse individuals populating her narrative will appeal to casual readers and specialists alike. An incisive sociological lens on a religion in flux, which, though centuries distant, continues to hold relevance for the present day. "Kirkus Reviews"

History with relevance: Professor Christine Leigh Heyrman uses her meticulous research on early American missionaries in the Middle East to explore the origins of present-day American behavior toward Islam. Daniel Walker Howe, Pulitzer Prize winning author of What Hath God Wrought: The Transformation of America, 1815 1848

In "American Apostles," Christine Leigh Heyrman tells a roistering tale of 'interesting' times when young American evangelicals, still wet behind the ears, ventured abroad to spread their good news, expecting to convert whole heathen nations and make the world over as Christian. Confounded by what they found, Heyrman's 'apostles' responded in radically different ways to cultures and religions that surprisingly often attracted the would-be empire builders. Few two-hundred-year-old stories have as much relevance to the conflicts of our own time as those Heyrman has uncovered in little-known private letters and dispatches and made vividly new for twenty-first-century readers. Megan Marshall, Pulitzer Prize winning author of Margaret Fuller: A New American Life"


Enthralling. "The New Yorker"

A striking narrative . . . This is a beautiful book and a delight to read. Americans of the early 19th century found the travels and insights of the missionaries inspiring. They asked new questions of themselves and the world. This reader in the 21st century feels similarly with Heyrman as his guide. Edward J. Blum, "The Chronicle Review"

["American Apostles"] follows a series of US missionaries who, in the early 19th century, abandoned the boosterism of the American Republic for the alien and baffling landscapes of the Middle East . . . Heyrman carefully explains how these crusaders became fascinated by the potential of their mission, but the book s most thrilling sections recount their struggles when things didn t turn out as they d imagined. Nicholas Guyatt, "The Nation"

Heyrman's engaging writing makes even obscure points of doctrine seem exciting and relevant, and her focus on the ambitions and misgivings of the diverse individuals populating her narrative will appeal to casual readers and specialists alike. An incisive sociological lens on a religion in flux, which, though centuries distant, continues to hold relevance for the present day. "Kirkus Reviews"

History with relevance: Professor Christine Leigh Heyrman uses her meticulous research on early American missionaries in the Middle East to explore the origins of present-day American behavior toward Islam. Daniel Walker Howe, Pulitzer Prize winning author of "What Hath God Wrought: The Transformation of America, 1815 1848"

In "American Apostles," Christine Leigh Heyrman tells a roistering tale of 'interesting' times when young American evangelicals, still wet behind the ears, ventured abroad to spread their good news, expecting to convert whole heathen nations and make the world over as Christian. Confounded by what they found, Heyrman's 'apostles' responded in radically different ways to cultures and religions that surprisingly often attracted the would-be empire builders. Few two-hundred-year-old stories have as much relevance to the conflicts of our own time as those Heyrman has uncovered in little-known private letters and dispatches and made vividly new for twenty-first-century readers. Megan Marshall, Pulitzer Prize winning author of "Margaret Fuller: A New American Life""


Winner of the Francis Parkman Prize

Enthralling. "The New Yorker"

A striking narrative . . . This is a beautiful book and a delight to read. Americans of the early 19th century found the travels and insights of the missionaries inspiring. They asked new questions of themselves and the world. This reader in the 21st century feels similarly with Heyrman as his guide. Edward J. Blum, "The Chronicle Review"

["American Apostles"] follows a series of US missionaries who, in the early 19th century, abandoned the boosterism of the American Republic for the alien and baffling landscapes of the Middle East . . . Heyrman carefully explains how these crusaders became fascinated by the potential of their mission, but the book s most thrilling sections recount their struggles when things didn t turn out as they d imagined. Nicholas Guyatt, "The Nation"

" American Apostles" is a work of surpassing interest and power. On the one hand, it vividly evokes the very particular ethos of 19th-century American evangelicals. On the other, it speaks, at least indirectly, to central issues and concerns of our own time. It achieves this bridging feat by way of meticulous research, shrewd analysis, and supple, elegantly evocative prose. Society of American Historians, citation for the Francis Parkman Prize

Heyrman's engaging writing makes even obscure points of doctrine seem exciting and relevant, and her focus on the ambitions and misgivings of the diverse individuals populating her narrative will appeal to casual readers and specialists alike. An incisive sociological lens on a religion in flux, which, though centuries distant, continues to hold relevance for the present day. "Kirkus Reviews"

History with relevance: Professor Christine Leigh Heyrman uses her meticulous research on early American missionaries in the Middle East to explore the origins of present-day American behavior toward Islam. Daniel Walker Howe, Pulitzer Prize winning author of "What Hath God Wrought: The Transformation of America, 1815 1848"

In "American Apostles," Christine Leigh Heyrman tells a roistering tale of 'interesting' times when young American evangelicals, still wet behind the ears, ventured abroad to spread their good news, expecting to convert whole heathen nations and make the world over as Christian. Confounded by what they found, Heyrman's 'apostles' responded in radically different ways to cultures and religions that surprisingly often attracted the would-be empire builders. Few two-hundred-year-old stories have as much relevance to the conflicts of our own time as those Heyrman has uncovered in little-known private letters and dispatches and made vividly new for twenty-first-century readers. Megan Marshall, Pulitzer Prize winning author of "Margaret Fuller: A New American Life""


Winner of the Francis Parkman Prize

Enthralling. The New Yorker

A striking narrative . . . This is a beautiful book and a delight to read. Americans of the early 19th century found the travels and insights of the missionaries inspiring. They asked new questions of themselves and the world. This reader in the 21st century feels similarly with Heyrman as his guide. Edward J. Blum, The Chronicle Review

[American Apostles] follows a series of US missionaries who, in the early 19th century, abandoned the boosterism of the American Republic for the alien and baffling landscapes of the Middle East . . . Heyrman carefully explains how these crusaders became fascinated by the potential of their mission, but the book s most thrilling sections recount their struggles when things didn t turn out as they d imagined. Nicholas Guyatt, The Nation

American Apostles is a work of surpassing interest and power. On the one hand, it vividly evokes the very particular ethos of 19th-century American evangelicals. On the other, it speaks, at least indirectly, to central issues and concerns of our own time. It achieves this bridging feat by way of meticulous research, shrewd analysis, and supple, elegantly evocative prose. Society of American Historians, citation for the Francis Parkman Prize

Heyrman's engaging writing makes even obscure points of doctrine seem exciting and relevant, and her focus on the ambitions and misgivings of the diverse individuals populating her narrative will appeal to casual readers and specialists alike. An incisive sociological lens on a religion in flux, which, though centuries distant, continues to hold relevance for the present day. Kirkus Reviews

History with relevance: Professor Christine Leigh Heyrman uses her meticulous research on early American missionaries in the Middle East to explore the origins of present-day American behavior toward Islam. Daniel Walker Howe, Pulitzer Prize winning author of What Hath God Wrought: The Transformation of America, 1815 1848

In American Apostles, Christine Leigh Heyrman tells a roistering tale of 'interesting' times when young American evangelicals, still wet behind the ears, ventured abroad to spread their good news, expecting to convert whole heathen nations and make the world over as Christian. Confounded by what they found, Heyrman's 'apostles' responded in radically different ways to cultures and religions that surprisingly often attracted the would-be empire builders. Few two-hundred-year-old stories have as much relevance to the conflicts of our own time as those Heyrman has uncovered in little-known private letters and dispatches and made vividly new for twenty-first-century readers. Megan Marshall, Pulitzer Prize winning author of Margaret Fuller: A New American Life

"

Winner of the Francis Parkman Prize

"Enthralling." --The New Yorker

"A striking narrative . . . This is a beautiful book and a delight to read. Americans of the early 19th century found the travels and insights of the missionaries inspiring. They asked new questions of themselves and the world. This reader in the 21st century feels similarly with Heyrman as his guide." --Edward J. Blum, The Chronicle Review

"[American Apostles] follows a series of US missionaries who, in the early 19th century, abandoned the boosterism of the American Republic for the alien and baffling landscapes of the Middle East . . . Heyrman carefully explains how these crusaders became fascinated by the potential of their mission, but the book's most thrilling sections recount their struggles when things didn't turn out as they'd imagined." --Nicholas Guyatt, The Nation

"American Apostles is a work of surpassing interest and power. On the one hand, it vividly evokes the very particular ethos of 19th-century American evangelicals. On the other, it speaks, at least indirectly, to central issues and concerns of our own time. It achieves this bridging feat by way of meticulous research, shrewd analysis, and supple, elegantly evocative prose." --Society of American Historians, citation for the Francis Parkman Prize

"A very readable account of a fascinating part of early American missions . . . By showing what goes wrong when assumptions and caricatures go unchallenged, Heyrman reminds the reader of the value of critical thinking as part of the missions process." --Henry Martinez, Covenant Companion

"Heyrman's engaging writing makes even obscure points of doctrine seem exciting and relevant, and her focus on the ambitions and misgivings of the diverse individuals populating her narrative will appeal to casual readers and specialists alike. An incisive sociological lens on a religion in flux, which, though centuries distant, continues to hold relevance for the present day." --Kirkus Reviews

"History with relevance: Professor Christine Leigh Heyrman uses her meticulous research on early American missionaries in the Middle East to explore the origins of present-day American behavior toward Islam." --Daniel Walker Howe, Pulitzer Prize-winning author of What Hath God Wrought: The Transformation of America, 1815-1848

"In American Apostles, Christine Leigh Heyrman tells a roistering tale of 'interesting' times when young American evangelicals, still wet behind the ears, ventured abroad to spread their good news, expecting to convert whole heathen nations and make the world over as Christian. Confounded by what they found, Heyrman's 'apostles' responded in radically different ways to cultures and religions that surprisingly often attracted the would-be empire builders. Few two-hundred-year-old stories have as much relevance to the conflicts of our own time as those Heyrman has uncovered in little-known private letters and dispatches and made vividly new for twenty-first-century readers." --Megan Marshall, Pulitzer Prize-winning author of Margaret Fuller: A New American Life

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