Visit our Christmas Gift Finder
Click & Collect from 2 Hours*
Free Delivery to UK Shops
Free UK Standard Delivery On all orders £20 and over Free Delivery to UK Shops Local shops and expert booksellers nationwide Free Click & Collect to UK shops From 2 hours of your order*
A World in Ruins: Chronicles of Intellectual Life, 1943 (Hardback)
  • A World in Ruins: Chronicles of Intellectual Life, 1943 (Hardback)
zoom

A World in Ruins: Chronicles of Intellectual Life, 1943 (Hardback)

(author), (translator)
£103.00
Hardback 320 Pages / Published: 01/02/2016
  • We can order this

Usually dispatched within 1 week

  • This item has been added to your basket

In certain key respects, 1943 marked a turning point in the war. Increasingly, victory seemed assured. However, the backdrop to this gradually improving situation was one of widespread and unremitting destruction.

In the essays from that year, Blanchot writes from a position of almost total detachment from day-to-day events, now that all of his projects and involvements have come to naught. As he explores and promotes works of literature and ideas, he privileges those with the capacity to sustain a human perspective that does not merely contemplate ruin and disaster but sees them as the occasion for a radical revision of what "human" is capable of signifying.

Consigning all that the name "France" has hitherto meant to him to a past that is now in ruins, Blanchot begins to sketch out a counter-history that is international in nature, and whose human field is literature.

Publisher: Fordham University Press
ISBN: 9780823267255
Number of pages: 320
Weight: 544 g
Dimensions: 229 x 152 x 25 mm


MEDIA REVIEWS
Maurice Blanchot's writings during the Vichy years (1941-44) may be the most crucial of his long career, particularly when read against his controversial political writings of the 1930s. Although to all appearances occasional pieces, these literary essays and reviews are also projects of self-transformation in which Blanchot becomes an increasingly distanced and even invisible observer of the disaster of Occupied France, as well as a writer whose critiques of the conventions of the novel look forward to his later experiments in fragmentary writing and the materializations of language. -- -Gerald L. Bruns * University of Notre Dame *
Writing from one world in ruins to another, Blanchot comes to us today to pose the question of what, if anything, deserves to survive the collapse of an established order of meaning. Through the richness and precision of Michael Holland's presentation of these texts, and the elegance and rigour of his translations, we meet with new understanding one of recent history's most stringent explorations of the possibilities and limitations of thought in the face of disaster. If the now-forgotten subjects of many of these essays might suggest that they have little to say to our present day, Holland helps us to see that nothing could be further from the truth. Blanchot is not writing to us, no doubt. But he is most certainly writing for us. -- -Martin Crowley * Queens' College *
...what makes Blanchot's critical essays so important is the depth of his engagement with writing as a concept and the experience of writing fiction that he brings to the task. An essential Blanchotian theme treated in this volume, as throughout his work, is the ambiguity of literary language. Blanchot conceives of literature as having a unique power to put language itself in question, exposing the reader or writer to what lies beyond meaning, knowledge, and all familiar relations... Holland has rendered readers a service by stressing the importance of historical context in interpreting Blanchot's writings, and by extension 20th-century French thought, more generally. -- -Calum Watt * Review 31 / Kings College *
How did Maurice Blanchot transform himself from journeyman reviewer to the theorist of narrative whose work transformed the intellectual landscape of the postwar era? This collection of reviews from a single, harrowing year, 1943, provides answers. Expertly introduced, annotated, and translated by leading Blanchot scholar Michael Holland, A World in Ruins provides a unique entry into making of literature under Nazi occupation. -- -Alice Kaplan * Yale University *

You may also be interested in...

Feel Free
Added to basket
£9.99
Paperback
Surfacing
Added to basket
£12.99
Hardback
The Doors of Perception
Added to basket
Calm the F**k Down
Added to basket
£14.99
Hardback
Essays
Added to basket
£20.00
Hardback
Me Talk Pretty One Day
Added to basket
The Road to Wigan Pier
Added to basket
Time Lived, Without Its Flow
Added to basket
Books v. Cigarettes
Added to basket
The Hobbits of Tolkien
Added to basket
£12.99
Paperback
Mad, Bad, Dangerous to Know
Added to basket
£9.99   £7.99
Paperback
The Dark Powers of Tolkien
Added to basket
March of the Lemmings
Added to basket
£14.99   £12.99
Paperback
Why I Write
Added to basket
£4.99
Paperback
The Good Immigrant
Added to basket

Please sign in to write a review

Your review has been submitted successfully.